Review: HTC TyTN II (AT&T Tilt) carry case

Htc_tytn_ii_case

One of several differences between the HTC TyTN II and the AT&T Tilt, its US counterpart, is that the HTC-branded carry case isn’t included with the Tilt. Disturbed that an official case (my favorite kind of accessory) was being withheld from me, I did some searching and found it at MobilePlanet for $18.

And after using it for about a week, I’m convinced that it should have been included free. Read my full review below to find out why.

Packaging

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The case is packaged in a spare-no-expenses plastic bag with a lopsided sticker identifying it as "HTC Standard Pouch with Logo" stuck on one side.

Design

I prefer pouches over cases that are meant to stay on a device while in use because I like my gadgets naked. Although they’re unprotected when not encased in leather, silicone, or any other material, they just look and feel better in the hand to me. That’s why this case appealed to me when I first saw it in BGR’s TyTN II unboxing gallery and why I bought it a few days after getting my Tilt.

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The case is fashioned out of synthetic suede and is lined with a fuzzy, slightly cushioned material that I’m guessing is some kind of polyester or cotton blend.

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It’s evident from the uneven, somewhat crooked stitching and off-centered belt clip on the back that quality craftsmanship wasn’t a top priority during the manufacturing process.

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The sides of the case are open, with a thick strap on both sides to hold the phone in place while still allowing access to some of the ports.

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A Velcro strap keeps the pouch, which opens envelope-style, securely shut. The strap adds an extra step between opening the case and removing the phone, as it needs to be pulled down to free the main flap (which then needs to be lifted up), so I actually wish it wasn’t there.

Belt clip

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As noted above, a non-removable belt clip is attached to the back.

Htc_tytn_ii_case_clip2

The clip is covered in the same suede-like material as the rest of the case, so it blends in pretty seamlessly. It’s also flatter than most belt clips, allowing the pouch to be laid on its back without being too lopsided.

Size

The case is relatively compact and not unreasonably bigger than the Tilt itself.

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It isn’t as slim as, say, a silicone skin or leather bodysuit, but it doesn’t add that much bulk to the device if you carry it in a purse or bag. The Tilt is fairly chunky on its own, though, so tucking it into a front/back pocket while in the pouch isn’t easy (depending on how baggy your pants are).

Fit

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The Tilt fits perfectly into the case, sliding into and out of it with little effort.

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Most of the ports and buttons are inaccessible when the pouch is closed, but given that it wasn’t designed to enable in-case use, I don’t see this as a problem. What is always accessible is the USB port, which is used for both charging the battery and connecting to a computer.

Conclusion

The carry case offers decent-looking protection for the HTC TyTN II, AT&T Tilt, and other similarly sized devices. Compared to cases I would normally buy (specifically those by Noreve and Vaja), this one is also very affordably priced.

Htc_tytn_ii_case_final

The problem, and the reason I think it should be bundled with the Tilt for free, is its usability. Pulling the Velcro strap down and lifting the top flap up is clumsy, requires two hands, and involves too many flips and turns if the case is pulled from a bag upside down or backwards. In other words, it just takes too long to get the phone out.

My search continues . . .

The HTC TyTN II carry case is available for $17.95 from MobilePlanet (US) and £9.95 from eXpansys (UK).

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Jenn K. Lee

Jenn K. Lee is the founder of Pocketables. She loves gadgets the way most women love shoes and purses. The pieces in her tech wardrobe that go with everything are currently the Samsung Galaxy Note II, Sony Tablet P, and Nexus 7, but there are still a couple of vintage UMPCs/MIDs in the back of her closet.

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