Review: UMID mbook M1

Umid_mbook_m1_review

While preparing my full review of the UMID mbook M1 that came out of its box a few weeks ago, I started to compile a list of everything I liked and disliked about the compact clamshell device (1.33GHz Atom Z520, 512MB RAM, 16GB SSD, Windows XP). I don't normally make lists like this, preferring instead to put my final thoughts together after the meat of the review is written, so I didn't expect to end up deciding to ditch my standard review format after the list was done.

The list was just so unbalanced that I think sharing it will be more useful to prospective buyers than my typical style. See what I mean below.

I'll post the list (in alphabetical order) first for those who can't stay long and then flesh everything out to make the whole thing more "review-y" and substantial for everyone else.

ProsCons
Battery life
Durability
Form factor
Keyboard
MicroSD card slot
Performance
Screen brightness
Screen resolution
Size/Weight
SSD
Standby
Stylus slot
Touchscreen quality
User community support
Versatility
Wireless button
512MB RAM
Build quality
No convertible screen
No mouse pointer
Non-standard ports
Screen angle
Single speaker
WiFi and Bluetooth behavior
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

UMID mbook M1 Pros

Battery life

Remember when UMPCs were always criticized for their poor battery life? Sure, there was the occasional exception that could run for more than 2.5 hours on a single charge, but up until only very recently, battery life was one of the worst features of the x86-based handheld computer. Well, no more! Today's MID-masquerading UMPCs (yes, the mbook M1 is a UMPC to me) have runtimes that can be bragged about; today's slim standard batteries are now putting in the hours of yesterday's bulky extended batteries.

The UMID mbook M1 is a great example of this. With WiFi and Bluetooth enabled and the screen set at mid-brightness, it's easy to get up to 5 hours of use between charges. Under certain conditions, it's not unheard of to push that number to over 6 hours.

Durability

Even though build quality is an issue with this device (more on this later), it's still solid and durable. The casing isn't ruggedized in any way, but it feels sturdy enough to throw around and withstand everyday wear and tear. I don't have to be extra careful when setting it down somewhere, handle it gingerly, or wrap it in a diaper when not in use.

Form factor

One of the nice things about a clamshell design is the automatic screen protection. With sliders/slide-and-tilts (my favorite form factor) and slates, the display is always exposed and therefore more prone to scratches, smudges, and dust collecting in the corners.

Umid_review_clamshell

The clamshell doesn't have this problem and is also much easier to slip into a pocket or put into a bag without a case. A convertible clamshell is probably the most versatile form factor since it can be used as a handheld, tablet, and mini laptop, but I think a non-convertible clamshell comes in second.

Keyboard

The UMID doesn't have the best thumb or multi-finger keyboard around, but its 56 keys are very good for both purposes. The unit is actually a hair too wide for my hands to have a perfectly comfortable thumb typing experience, but it's definitely more comfortable than other devices with a similar form factor. The keys have a good feel to them, press down easily with thumb or finger, and offer both tactile and audible (quiet tapping) feedback.

Other things I like about the keyboard are the dedicated number row and Fn key shortcuts, which provide quick access to brightness settings, volume, the battery meter, webcam, and standby mode.

Umid_review_kbmp

Some may not be pleased with the single shift key on the left, but StickyKeys makes that a non-issue for me. What I do have trouble with, however, are the keys that require the Fn and shift keys to be pressed at the same time. This key combination is required to access basic punctuation like the question mark and double quotes, which I use often, and StickyKeys doesn't recognize it.

Umid_review_shift_fn

The reason this isn't a dealbreaker, though, is that the Fn and shift keys are stacked and can easily be held down with one finger/thumb.

Wondering about typing speeds? I'm thumb typing on the UMID mbook M1 at a net speed of about 45 wpm and multi-finger typing at about 47 wpm. You can see how these numbers compare to some other gadgets in my mobile device keyboard typing speeds chart.

MicroSD card slot

Expansion card slots of any kind are always a plus in my book, and the super tiny microSD card is definitely one of my favorites. A lot of phones, DAPs, and PMPs use this format, so I always have a few cards laying around.

Umid_review_microsd

Umid_diskmark_microsd

A microSD card is a quick and inexpensive way to increase storage capacity and transfer files, making the size of the internal SSD and the absence of a standard USB port on the UMID mbook easy to work around.

Performance

Even though the M1 doesn't have top-of-the-line specs, few can find fault with the pairing of Windows XP and the 1.33GHz Intel Atom Z520 processor in a package this small.

Umid_crystalmark

It isn't the snappiest system ever made, mostly because it has only 512MB of RAM, but it's still enjoyably usable without any optimizations. Of course, performance can be greatly improved by using applications that aren't resource hogs and trimmed down Windows installations like nLite, but for basic computing tasks like web browsing and word processing, the M1 runs fine out of the box.

Screen brightness

The mbook M1 has a nice bright screen that is viewable in direct sunlight (max brightness) and bright enough to make the keyboard visible in a dark room (shown below).

Umid_review_bright

I don't know if the display actually has an anti-glare coating on it, but it certainly seems like it does. Whereas some devices can double as mirrors at lower brightness settings, you won't see your reflection when using the M1.

Screen resolution

I can get by with an 800 x 480 display, but I'm much happier when UMPCs/MIDs have screens with a 1024 x 600 resolution.

Umid_review_res

Most websites are pretty well optimized for this resolution, so horizontal scrolling (which is a major nuisance) is almost never an issue.

Size/Weight

Considering that the 11.1-ounce UMID mbook M1's specs are very similar to considerably larger devices like the Sony Vaio P and Willcom D4, its 6.2" x 3.7" x 0.7" casing is downright tiny.

Umid_review_nc10 

Umid_review_vaiop 

Umid_review_size

Umid_review_wii

There's no question about whether it can comfortably fit into a pocket either. And I'm not talking about one of those large pockets you find on jackets or cargo pants; I mean a regular jeans or front shirt pocket.

SSD

The UMID mbook has one of the fastest SSDs preinstalled on any mobile computer.

Umid_diskmark_ssd 

I've had my SSD-equipped Sony Vaio P for nearly four months now, and I don't think I'll ever buy another computer without an SSD. I'm just too spoiled by the quick boot time, non-moving parts, and low maintenance to go back to a spinning hard drive.

Particularly with a handheld device like the mbook, which is designed with mobility in mind, an SSD is really a must-have. It definitely adds to the durability factor mentioned earlier as well.

Standby

Like the Viliv S5 Premium, the mbook M1 also boasts such excellent standby battery time that there's no reason to ever hibernate the XP machine to conserve power when not in use. After 12 hours of being in standby, which awakens in seconds, my review unit saw a battery drain of just 11%. That's better than sleep mode in Vista!

Stylus slot

Having a dedicated place on a device to store its stylus may not seem important, but to me it's a case of not appreciating what you have until it's gone.

Umid_review_stylus

I like not having to carry the stylus separately or leave it dangling from a strap loop; it's just tidier and more convenient.

Touchscreen quality

The mbook's touchscreen is accurate and flawlessly responsive even to light touches. Windows XP may not be optimized for the finger, but with a few simple tweaks and the mbook M1's fantastic touchscreen, the OS is easy to navigate. Some of the smaller targets are still better suited for the stylus than the fingertip, but overall the touch experience is excellent.

When the device is used in laptop mode, the bottom half isn't really heavy enough to keep the unit from tipping over when the screen is tapped with too much force. Once you realize how lightly you can actually tap the screen to get things done, however, mbook tipping isn't a problem.

User community support

One of the drawbacks to buying a device that hasn't been released worldwide is often the lack of support. Whether you need help troubleshooting a problem, are looking for advice from a more experienced user, or just want to connect with other owners, it can be difficult to get any of it if the device in question doesn't have a mainstream following.

Umid_review_forum

Fortunately, mbook users don't need to wait for the MID to take off before they have a place to gather. It's still in its infancy, but the UMID mbook M1 forum is currently the most active English-speaking community you'll find on the net. And it continues to grow!

Versatility

The M1 is currently the most versatile full-blown Windows computer that can truly fit in a pocket. It has the same mini laptop form factor as the Fujitsu U810/U820 or Kohjinsha SC3 (though without the convertible screen), but because of its compact size, it can be used with equal comfort for thumb typing when held between both hands and multi-finger typing when used on a flat surface. Both usage scenarios are possible with other devices, of course, but one use is inevitably always better than the other because of the device's size, design, etc.

Umid_review_typing

With the UMID, however, users come closer than ever before to having the best of both worlds. I don't think the mbook offers the best single-use experience, as the OQO Model 02 (and 2+ that may never see a release) has a better thumboard and something like the Everun Note has a better hunt-and-peck/touch-typable keyboard, but nothing on the market is better for both uses. Connect it to a full-size keyboard and monitor and provided that your computing requirements aren't too demanding, you could even have a third use: primary PC. This last one may not be practical for most people, but it can certainly be done.

Wireless button

Though a keyboard shortcut could perform the same function just as well, I still like the quick access to enabling/disabling the wireless radios that a dedicated wireless button provides.

Umid_review_wireless

WiFi and Bluetooth are automatically turned off when the UMID mbook awakens from standby, so the button is very useful and faster/easier than having to use any kind of wireless manager utility. Of course, it would be better if the radios didn't turn off on their own, but turning them on isn't too much of a nuisance.

UMID mbook M1 Cons

It's obvious from my unbalanced list of pros and cons that I think the UMID mbook M1 has more going for it than against it. It isn't without its share of flaws, but none of the mbook's shortcomings is a true dealbreaker to me. Because some of them may be enough to give others reason to rethink a potential purchase, however, I've included a cheeky "why it doesn't really matter" bit at the end of each con's section to explain why the "problem" isn't really as bad as it seems.

512MB RAM

The UMID mbook ships with 512MB of RAM that cannot be replaced or upgraded because it's soldered onto the motherboard.

Why it doesn't really matter: I've often likened XP running on 512MB of RAM to Vista running on 1GB of RAM. The analogy may not be airtight, but I do feel that both operating systems can run reasonably well on what I consider to be their RAM minimums. Yes, double the RAM would make a significant improvement on performance (mostly in terms of response time and multitasking ability), but the minimum is sufficient for basic tasks that don't require a lot of horsepower. The RAM limitation can also be overcome by optimizing XP, moving the pagefile to a microSD card, and using leaner alternatives to popular applications.

Build quality

The plastic casing creaks and feels cheaper and more toy-like than other devices.

Umid_review_bq

Build quality issues were responsible for UMID recalling the first shipment of mbook M1s earlier this year, and subsequent shipments still has some lingering issues.

Why it doesn't really matter: I believe the materials themselves are good; it's the way they've been put together that leaves a little something to be desired. This doesn't excuse the quality issues but as mentioned in the "Durability" pro section above, the mbook is still sturdy and durable in spite of them.

No convertible screen

The mbook M1 doesn't feature a convertible design, so its display doesn't swivel 180 degrees for slate/tablet use. Many find slate mode to be useful for taking notes, reading ebooks, watching movies, and doing other activities that don't require a keyboard. Note: It's possible that a second-generation mbook will be equipped with such a display.

Umid_review_book

Why it doesn't really matter: Not being able to rotate the mbook's screen isn't an issue for me because I'm personally not a fan of slates and I simply don't use my handheld computers like that. If my Fujitsu U810 and Kohjinsha SC3, both convertible UMPCs, suddenly lost their screen-swiveling ability, I wouldn't notice or miss the feature. Since others may feel differently, I'll add that the 4.8-inch display isn't well-suited for inking (XP Home lacks tablet functionality, anyway), ebooks can be read comfortably by rotating the screen orientation (Ctrl + Alt + arrow key shortcut) and holding the MID like a real book, and the clamshell form factor is great for hands-free movie viewing because of the "built-in stand."

No mouse pointer

Though the original M1 design included a mouse pointer/trackstick, the retail version of the unit does not have any kind of hardware pointing device.

Why it doesn't really matter: The touchscreen is so good (see "Touchscreen quality" pro section above) that a pointer isn't necessary. Yes, it's less convenient to change your hand position to tap the touchscreen with your fingertip or the stylus, but it's not difficult to do because the device is so light (easy to hold with one hand) and the quality of the touchscreen is so high.

Non-standard ports

One of most immediately off-putting anomalies about the mbook M1 is the lack of standard ports. Instead of a full-size USB 2.0 port and 3.5mm headphone jack, the MID has miniUSB and TTA 20-pin ports.

Umid_review_adapters

Why it doesn't really matter: Okay, well, I can understand why some people may consider these non-standard ports to be automatic dealbreakers. But before you write off the mbook, take note of a few things: 1) UMID provides adapters (yes, they look ridiculous, but at least they're included); 2) a microSD card can easily replace a USB drive for file transfers, back-ups, and extra storage; 3) you can always use Bluetooth headphones. Adapters are still necessary for connecting other peripherals and a good pair of wired earphones, but the absence of standard ports isn't the end of the world.

Screen angle

Unlike the UMID mbook shown at CES 2009, which had a screen that could open almost completely flat (see photos here), the retail mbook's display opens to only about a 135-degree angle.

Umid_review_angle

This is fine for tabletop use but not exactly ideal for handheld use.

Umid_review_scrang1

When holding the MID at what is a natural thumb-typing position for me, the screen isn't easily viewable.

Why it doesn't really matter: The screen may not be easily viewable when the unit is held between two hands, but it is still viewable. A slight adjustment to the way the device is held is required to see the screen better, but it doesn't affect thumb typing comfort too badly.

Single speaker

Don't let that strategically placed Hancom Linux sticker you've seen earlier fool you. The UMID mbook M1 has just one speaker located on the left side of the display.

Umid_review_speaker

Why it doesn't really matter: Stereo speakers would be better, sure, but the mono speaker actually produces decent sound at a fairly loud volume. It won't fill a large room with sound, of course, but it's loud enough to hear at a normal laptop/handheld distance without straining or pressing your ear against it.

WiFi and Bluetooth behavior

I mentioned earlier that the WiFi and Bluetooth radios are automatically turned off when the UMID mbook awakens from standby, which is probably how most users keep their systems when not in use because of the fast resume time and excellent battery life. Another wireless quirk worth noting is that the WiFi and Bluetooth radios are "connected"; they cannot be turned on/off individually. So either they're both on or both off.

Why it doesn't really matter: Having to manually turn on the wireless functions every time the unit is awakened is a little annoying, but the dedicated wireless button (cited as a pro above) makes doing so easy and fairly quick. As for the WiFi and Bluetooth being linked, I don't see it as a problem. Battery life is still great when both are on (~5 hours).

Final Thoughts

Umid_review_final

Considering that I came up with twice as many pros than cons and explained why none of those cons were dealbreaking flaws for me, it's no secret that my feelings about the UMID mbook M1 MID are very positive. There are obviously compromises involved in using the mbook, but I think it comes closer than any other device ever has to providing the full computing experience in a truly pocketable form.

:: Visit the UMID mbook M1 forum to connect with users and potential buyers, ask questions, and share tips ::

Thanks to Justek for providing the mbook for review!

Pocketables does not accept targeted advertising, phony guest posts, paid reviews, etc. Help us keep this way with support on Patreon!
become a patron button - for some reason we don't have an alt tag here

Jenn K. Lee

Jenn K. Lee is the founder of Pocketables. She loves gadgets the way most women love shoes and purses. The pieces in her tech wardrobe that go with everything are currently the Samsung Galaxy Note II, Sony Tablet P, and Nexus 7, but there are still a couple of vintage UMPCs/MIDs in the back of her closet.

More posts by Jenn | Subscribe to Jenn's posts

Avatar of Jenn K. Lee

41 thoughts on “Review: UMID mbook M1

  • Avatar of Nate
    May 13, 2009 at 4:09 am
    Permalink

    You’re tempting me, Jenn.

    I really shouldn’t want this thing, because it breaks too many of my rules. You explained away a good chunk of those broken rules for me. Now I’m sitting here considering purchasing something that I know I shouldn’t even like.

    Reply
  • Avatar of John in Norway
    May 13, 2009 at 4:39 am
    Permalink

    Fantastic review and pictures, Jenn. I think you answered all my questions although it hasn’t helped me make up my mind on what to buy. Well, actually it has. I think. :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of melmo
    May 13, 2009 at 5:27 am
    Permalink

    Hey Jenn, great review. I was wondering if the Sony Mylo headphone adapter fits in the UMID? Probably not, but I’m curious.

    Reply
  • Avatar of scoobie
    May 13, 2009 at 8:41 am
    Permalink

    Re the casing your forum members are reporting, and the umid website is reporting that the casing is being switched to a new manufacturer. The new case should be shipping from middle of May

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 1:24 pm
    Permalink

    I’m tempting myself too! Up until I finished the review, I had no plans to buy one for myself. Now I’m not so sure. :D

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 1:26 pm
    Permalink

    There’s supposed to be a 3G version but at this point, it’s anyone’s guess when it’ll actually be released.

    Edit: Hey, the comment I’m responding to disappeared!

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 1:32 pm
    Permalink

    Funny you should ask because it’s the first thing I tried. Unfortunately, it doesn’t fit. I think TTA 20-pin ports are used on some cell phones, though, so maybe there are some smaller adapters out there that would work.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 1:36 pm
    Permalink

    Yeah, I saw that in the forum but it sounded like the new casing was actually just the current one. I thought someone said that the seller on eBay has actually been shipping out the original units.

    As far as I know, wasn’t the casing only fixed once (after the recall)?

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 1:37 pm
    Permalink

    Lucky! I think others must have received blemish-free units too because I haven’t heard too many complaints.

    Reply
  • Avatar of scoobie
    May 13, 2009 at 1:51 pm
    Permalink

    No, I think it is a second design. Because there was recent blog on the umid website saying they were changing case manufacturer. And this was well after the first recall.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 13, 2009 at 2:11 pm
    Permalink

    Good to know! A few people in the forum are awaiting delivery of these new casings, so it won’t be long before we find out how different they really are. I think ArchiMark is expecting his this week. :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of scoobie
    May 13, 2009 at 2:13 pm
    Permalink

    http://i-mbook.co.kr/news/news_view.php?id=18&record_start=1

    This was posted around April 15th on umids website which was after the first recall.

    translated with google

    Hello!
    All of our products, please use gogaesukyeo people will thank you.
    The current contents of the issue I’d like to answer.

    1. Appearance Issues
    : Appearance of the problem still did not get to meet customers sobijabun I apologize.
    Modifying a car despite mold and injection molding company’s quality standards do not reach the goal level as our two cars to fix, and even endure the loss of more mold in the batch relegate the party to determine the progress made by .
    Soon hope to introduce quality improvements.

    Link to the above, this was posted on the umid website on the 15th

    Reply
  • Avatar of melmo
    May 13, 2009 at 4:24 pm
    Permalink

    Fixup, on my unit the left hinge looks like yours, but on the right hinge there is a small bump near the keyboard. Does yours have this too?

    Reply
  • Avatar of melmo
    May 13, 2009 at 4:29 pm
    Permalink

    I bought a 3G headphone adapter from a hyaku-yen store (basically a dollar store) in Japan. It didn’t fit either. It would probably fit the Mylo :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Marc
    May 13, 2009 at 9:52 pm
    Permalink

    Nice review Jenn.

    I’ve just taken delivery of an S5 from Dynamism. When I weighed up the pros and cons of both units, that just won it for me.

    Using it for a day, it’s lovely, but the lack of a place to put a stylus (unless you use the leather case all the time, or the silly pointer on the lanyard) and the fact the buttons stay lit in a dark room (detracting from video playing) have really annoyed me so far!

    Probably not enough to change for a UMID.

    On a side issue, is there any way to make the site notify you about new comments like on UMPC portal?

    Reply
  • Avatar of Marc
    May 13, 2009 at 9:58 pm
    Permalink

    Doh. It seems the buttons stay lit all the time. (Still annoying!)

    Reply
  • Avatar of John in Norway
    May 14, 2009 at 12:35 am
    Permalink

    I’m almost set on the SC3. It’s very difficult to make a decision without actually handling the devices. I was almost decided on the UMID until I came across the SC3 (can’t believe I’d missed it). It appears to have everything I want, apart from 6 hour battery life, and I think the larger screen will be better for me (old, tired eyes) and for note taking as well. Just waiting for my Paypal account to be verified before I pull the trigger. Can you believe $120 for delivery?

    Reply
  • Avatar of JC
    May 14, 2009 at 2:49 am
    Permalink

    When saying that something is truly pocketable, it’s important to specify the size of the pocket. The UMID M1 fits in a jacket pocket. It doesn’t fit in a front pant pocket. Its width is about the same as the pocket mouth making it hard to slide in. Once I jam it in, it doesn’t sit very deeply meaning that it extends above the pocket mouth and jabs me in the hip when I sit.

    (Note: I didn’t try this with an actual UMID M1. I mocked up a box of the same dimensions. I’m looking for something that fits in my front pant pocket so I needed some way of figuring out whether it might comfortably before I spend any money.)

    It’s interesting how slight changes in dimension end up being really important. Whereas the UMID M1 just misses fitting, the Viliv S5 just manages to fit even though they’re both approximately 6″ in their longest dimension. The Viliv is narrower so it’s easier to get in and out of the pocket and it seats more deeply into the pocket. Of course, the OQO is even smaller than either one. (And there are those who argue that no one should be putting any of these devices in a pant pocket.)

    The UMID M1 sounds like a terrific device. It’s gotten lots of great reviews. But people looking for something that fits within a pant pocket unfortunately have to look elsewhere. (Yes, this is basically saying that the UMID M1 doesn’t do what it wasn’t designed to do. Not surprising, but a little disappointing nonetheless since it does seem like such a terrific little device.)

    Reply
  • Avatar of melmo
    May 14, 2009 at 4:02 am
    Permalink

    My M1 does fit in my front pants pocket. Granted it’s a bit big and I wouldn’t carry it around in there all the time, but it does fit.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Neill
    May 14, 2009 at 7:48 am
    Permalink

    Question on pocketability: why not get a pocket modified to accept the device of your dreams, rather than wait for the device of your dreams to fit your pocket perfectly?

    Non-humorous aside….there’s something so alluring about a computer this small, that has such capability. Can I justify getting yet another computer? Of course not! Do I want one though? Of course!!

    Reply
  • Avatar of Fixup
    May 14, 2009 at 8:15 am
    Permalink

    Try a real UMID before you make a clue. Nothing else fits into any pocket more comfortably. My M1 is in my pant all the time and feels nothing, which was never the case with my OQO.

    Reply
  • Avatar of scoobie
    May 14, 2009 at 8:39 am
    Permalink

    OQO is very heavy in the pocket , and I imagine the umid isn’t- another plus for the umid

    Reply
  • Avatar of John in Norway
    May 14, 2009 at 8:53 am
    Permalink

    You have a pocket in your pants? That’s weird and slightly off-putting.:)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 14, 2009 at 1:15 pm
    Permalink

    Good to hear you’re enjoying the Viliv. Maybe you could get one of those thumb-tip styluses or grow out your fingernails a bit so you don’t need to use those less convenient alternatives. ;)

    As for comment notifications, unfortunately, no. The blogging platform and comments system I use doesn’t offer that feature. I do have an RSS feed specifically for comments, but it isn’t as handy as email notifications would be. It’s here if you’re interested: http://feeds.feedburner.com/PocketablesComments

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 14, 2009 at 1:18 pm
    Permalink

    As others have noted, the M1 *does* fit into a front pants pocket. I tried it with my husband’s jeans and slacks before I wrote the review to make sure. It also fits in a front shirt pocket, though it sticks out at the top quite a bit.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 14, 2009 at 1:27 pm
    Permalink

    Haha, yeah. Actually, isn’t the mylo adapter/connector really common in Japan? Maybe it isn’t used in Korea.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jenn K. Lee
    May 14, 2009 at 1:31 pm
    Permalink

    Wow! Where are you planning to order it from?

    I’m actually surprised that the SC3 made you reconsider getting the UMID, though, as I don’t really think of them as competitors. I don’t use my SC3 anymore but I can understand why it’s winning you over. It was an impulse purchase for me; I just liked it so much during my review that I just couldn’t send it back! It’s not without its shortcomings, of course, but I think you’ll enjoy it. Are you getting the extended battery too?

    Reply
  • Avatar of ArchiMark
    May 14, 2009 at 5:17 pm
    Permalink

    You got that right, Jenn!….

    Unfortunately, my lil’ bad boy is still showing as going through Customs in San Francisco, just up the street from me, so close, yet so far…. ;-/

    Hopefully, it will be out of there by tomorrow morning and on it’s way for delivery to me on Friday!….

    Reply
  • Avatar of John in Norway
    May 15, 2009 at 12:15 am
    Permalink

    I’ve ordered it from Conics – 2GB, extended battery, European plug!
    I liked the UMID because of its size but after thinking about it, I sometimes wished my OQO had a bigger screen. If the UMID had a rotating screen I would have been more tempted. My three input methods are: keyboard (preferably thumb), inking and voice dictation. The UMID had too many compromises. The SC3 fell completely off my radar – I even asked you some questions about it when you reviewed it.
    If everything you said about it is true (and I’m sure it was :)) then I think it could be even better for me than the OQO!
    I’m trying to sort out my new Paypal account. I’ve sent Brett the deposit but Paypal won’t let me send the remainder and neither of us can work out why.

    Reply
  • Avatar of melmo
    May 15, 2009 at 2:20 am
    Permalink

    Well, you can buy those adapters in dollar stores in Japan, so it must be pretty common :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Mukk
    July 12, 2009 at 7:15 pm
    Permalink

    hello…where I can buy mbook m1? Give me please english sites of on-line stores.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jack Legal
    August 13, 2009 at 6:21 pm
    Permalink

    How do I install Microsoft Office in MBooK?

    Reply
  • Avatar of win xp is not for touchscreen devices
    August 26, 2009 at 11:43 pm
    Permalink

    I think the biggest problem with this is that Windows XP doesn’t know it’s inside this small computer that should be used with the stylus.

    Reply
  • Avatar of PaulSaul
    September 7, 2009 at 9:18 am
    Permalink

    I’ve had my Umid m1 for 1 week and I’m loving it so far. Thumb typing is pretty comfortable, the touchscreen is effective, the angle problem has been corrected, at least it is comfortable for viewing to me. Thanks Jen for the tip on how to rotate the screen. I had no idea you could do that! Also, the adapter from micro to regular usb that ships now looks better than the one they used to ship. I do have 2 complaints. 1. The wi-fi seems to have weak reception. Places in my house where I can easily get a decent signal w/ my laptop I get a weak or no signal w/ the umid. 2. They no longer ship the m1 w/ an adapter for 3.5mm headphones. Instead, they ship headphones that fit the slot. I’d rather have an adapter and use my own headphones. Does anybody know where I can find an adapter?

    Reply
  • Avatar of brandontx1
    October 6, 2009 at 2:01 pm
    Permalink

    again those huge surrounding edges.
    sigh
    otherwise this product could have been some what a hot potato.
    i don’t know whether to laugh at it or what.
    deep inside, wanted to get the product, but disgusted by it’s design.
    god-bless us for better tomorrow.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Nai
    October 11, 2009 at 2:31 pm
    Permalink

    Where can you buy it at???

    Reply
  • Avatar of John
    October 14, 2009 at 11:28 pm
    Permalink

    Wow theres not much ram and hard drive space. It looks slow…. I can’t understand why they cant put more in….. Looks cool anyways..

    Reply
  • Avatar of super p force bestellen
    September 28, 2011 at 2:21 am
    Permalink

    Well I like its features and color also..But what I dislike is Windows XP..It would be much better if it has windows 7 which is the latest…

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.