LinuxUMPC

Nokia N900 gets official

Nokia_n900_ps

All the recent leaks and live photos certainly take the air out of Nokia’s N900 announcement today, but nonetheless, the Maemo 5 slider that has disappointed those who were hoping for a “real” N810 successor is now officially official.

There aren’t any surprises hidden in the press release, so the device that “has evolved from Nokia’s previous generation of Internet Tablets” does indeed pack an ARM Cortex A8 CPU and 1GB of application memory inside its sliding QWERTY housing, which of course features the same 3.5-inch WVGA resistive touchscreen that many of us were hoping would be bigger. Other highlights we already knew about include the 32GB of internal storage, microSD slot (up to 16GB cards supported), and 5-megapixel camera.

Nokia_n900_ps2

The N900 is expected to be released “in select markets” in October for €500 (€50 cheaper than previously reported), excluding carrier subsidies.

Anyone marking their calendars?

[Engadget]
Pocketables does not accept targeted advertising, phony guest posts, paid reviews, etc. Help us keep this way with support on Patreon!
Become a patron at Patreon!

Jenn K. Lee

Jenn K. Lee is the founder of Pocketables. She loves gadgets the way most women love shoes and purses. The pieces in her tech wardrobe that go with everything are currently the Samsung Galaxy Note II, Sony Tablet P, and Nexus 7, but there are still a couple of vintage UMPCs/MIDs in the back of her closet.

More posts by Jenn | Subscribe to Jenn's posts

Avatar of Jenn K. Lee

23 thoughts on “Nokia N900 gets official

  • Not much of an improvement,compared to my N810, especially the small screen, 3.5″ what the heck is that!!
    I for one won’t be marking my calendar!!

    Reply
  • The processor, memory, graphics acceleration, and integrated 3G are huge improvements! I sold my N810 about nine months ago as my G1 did everything required, but I’ll certainly be pawing this one to see what I think.

    Reply
  • 3.5″ while not ideal, is workable.. HW acceleration, Cortex 8, desktop class O/S, community of developers and programmers backing it. sign me up TODAY.
    Only thing i’m hesitant on is the display width.. i HATE, HATE narrow screens.. N97, Samsung Instinct etc. Iphone(of course) does screen dimensions perfectly.

    Reply
  • Avatar of John Q. Public

    Too big for a phone, too small for a MID. I’ll stick with my N810 and wait for a next gen Samsung Mondi.

    Reply
  • Whatever money I have left after my upcoming two month stay in Spain will go towards that thingamajig there ;) I love how the OS looks, hopefully it’s great in real life too!

    Reply
  • I have to say, surprisingly the OS looks much better than I expected. The question is, will it end up being a geek-device again.

    I don’t mean anything derogatory by that at all, I had an n800, but you definitely had to know what you were doing to make the thing useful. It was at the exact opposite end of the spectrum from the iPhone with regard to usability, I think.

    As someone who owns a Pre that uses that same Cortex A8 CPU though, the specs are a huge leap forward from the n800. Then add 1GB RAM (that’s sort of crazy on a mobile device) and GPU acceleration which the Pre doesn’t support yet, and this thing should be really speedy.

    Reply
  • But then again, downsides to it are resistive touch and 1320mAh battery. The Pre has an 1150 mAh battery and just barely is tolerable for me. 1320mAh for something that includes what the Pre has and more, hardware-wise, is probably going to be iffy.

    It’s a shame that battery technology hasn’t been able to move forward as quickly as everything else, because I feel like 9 times out of 10, that’s the biggest negative in a lot of new devices- the battery just can’t last as long as it should.

    Reply
  • To comment to myself just one last time, apparently the 1GB thing is slightly misleading. Like the Pre and iPhone 3GS it’ll only have 256MB RAM. However, like the n800 it can use virtual memory from the storage, and Maemo5 lets you use up to 768MB virtual memory.

    Reply
  • If I were in the market for a new phone, I would consider getting this. Since I’m sticking with my iPhone 3GS, though, I’m going to pass.

    If Nokia comes out with a slightly bigger non-phone version, however, then I’d be all for it.

    Reply
  • It’s actually smaller (though thicker) than the iPhone, so I don’t think the size is too much of an issue.

    The problem for me is that it was basically outed as the N810 successor. If it had been announced as a new smartphone or an N97 upgrade or something, my expectations wouldn’t have been what they were.

    So many devices are breaking out of their former boundaries and crossing over into other categories. MIDs, phones, DAPs/PMPs, and cameras are all becoming the same thing!

    Reply
  • It looks *much* more consumer-friendly than the N800/N810. Tech folk will likely get more out of it than the average consumer through hacks and homebrew apps, of course, but I think mainstream users will be able to really enjoy it as well. People still seem pretty gaga over gestures like flicking and swiping, so I bet the UI will be well received and non-techie buyers won’t feel like they’re “missing out” on the iPhone.

    Reply
  • Avatar of StarTAC Fan

    Does a resistive touchscreen permit gestures such as flicking and swiping? I thought that was only in capacitive screens such as on the iPhone.

    Reply
  • Yes. In oversimplified terms, capacitive is finger only and resistive is finger + stylus. Again, this is grossly oversimplified and not technically accurate but it’s good enough for a basic understanding. So the type of screen does not affect the ability to support gestures.

    I don’t think the N900 supports multitouch, which is another story.

    Reply
  • Avatar of orbitalcomp

    I’m in for one! Maemo 5 looks much more ready for prime-time than even the N8XX series was in its prime.

    Hopefully this thing will work in EDGE mode on AT&T, since the 3G will be T-Mobile. I haven’t heard anything about carrier lockdown, so hopefully they are the same in every country that way i can get one through Dynamism or whoever will be importing them early to the U.S.

    Reply
  • Most resistive touchscreens, if you want any degree of control on them, you have to use a fingernail or some other hard surface.

    There’s some that are really well done for touching with a finger, but I’d take a capacitive screen over that any day.

    Reply
  • Though, it’s cold in Finland… they probably don’t make things with capacitive screens because they’re wearing gloves all the time. :p

    Reply
  • I’ve sold my Viliv S5 in readiness for when this is released. My HTC Touch Diamond 2 will be next to go. Will be using a 3 yr old dumbphone for now.

    Reply
  • I’m glad to see the Finnish Engineers decided to go with MicroSD memory expansion instead of the “MiniSD” cards they used for the N810
    Wonder if the Engineers had frostbitten brains when they came out with that idea!! Who uses MiniSD expansion cards!!??

    Reply
  • Avatar of ArchiMark

    FWIW, having had briefly both the N800 and N810 (along with many other small devices..), I was interested in the N900 until a read that they display was reduced down to 3.5″….interface does look nice though…

    So, now, thinking about either another M1 or the new Sharp, but that’s just me…. ;-)

    Reply
  • The screen size is one of the biggest turn-offs for me too. It’s fine for a phone, but since I don’t want/need a new phone right now, I’ll just wait for Nokia to release a bigger-screened non-phone version. :-)

    Reply
  • Avatar of StarTAC Fan

    Any chance they will make this for North American frequencies?

    Reply
  • Avatar of ReadingIsGood

    It’s coming out on T-Mobile USA, so yes.

    Reply
  • Avatar of StarTAC Fan

    I was actually hoping for the 1900/850 MHz bands. T Mo, I think, uses 1700. Their coverage is limited.

    Unfortunately, there is past precedence to make a guess whether they would release a variant of the N900 that would support the more common North American HSPA bands. The previous N models did not connect to a cellular carrier.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *