HTC EVO 4G brings first “supersonic” Android handset to Sprint

Sprint_evo_1 Sprint just pulled a major surprise out of their bag at the CTIA 2010 show by unveiling the HTC EVO 4G (aka HTC Supersonic), the first smartphone able to latch onto those speedy 4G interwebs that they're deploying around the country. Talk about bad timing for T-Mobile, whose own HTC HD2 will go on sale tomorrow morning and suddenly looks a bit outdated already.

Rumored for the past few months, the EVO 4G will feature the SenseUI and Android 2.1 with the same luscious 800×480 capacitive touchscreen as its older sibling, along with the CDMA variant of the 1GHz Snapdragon processor, 1GB flash storage, and 512MB RAM. Also in the mix are a 1500 mAh battery, an 8MP camera with dual-flash that can handle 720p video, plus HDMI-out that works in conjunction with an adapter cable. A front-facing 1.3MP camera that is actually supported will be a first for any US carrier, and this almost gets lost in all the 4G excitement. Of course, 802.11b/g are both standard, and the same goes for Bluetooth 2.1 and the usual included microSDHC card, which is 8GB this time.

While top-end specs are always welcome, the heart and soul of this phone, and what has kept jethro_static and myself waiting anxiously for it, is the WiMAX connectivity. While voice calls will still travel over the standard EVDO Rev. A network, data will get the supercharged 4G treatment in supported cities, while 3G fallback should be seamless. The included Sprint Mobile Hotspot app will make the EVO 4G behave just like a Novatel MiFi or Sierra Wireless Overdrive, allowing up to eight users to connect to the phone via WiFi, all while sharing that fat data pipe.

Check out some more pics of this hot new HTC after the break, and be prepared to witness the current pinnacle of smartphone technology, coming this summer to the "Now Network."

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[Sprint – HTC EVO 4G Portal]

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Chris King

Chris King is a former contributing editor at Pocketables.