Good and EVO

What are you doing with your rooted HTC EVO 4G?

Rooted-evo-useNow that the HTC EVO 4G has been fully rooted for an entire week, we're starting to see more EVO-specific hacks being developed to take advantage of the unlocked NAND.

Whether it's flashing custom ROMs, disabling the Search button, enabling 802.11n, creating custom boot screens, or just installing apps from Android Market that are only for rooted phones, I'd love to know what kinds of things you're doing with your EVO. I'm not really into the rooting scene and am happy with my non-rooted EVO just the way it is (with some apps, of course!), but I can be easily persuaded over to the other side if there's something I really want over there.

Oh, and if you haven't rooted your EVO because original instructions were too daunting, there's a new program called SimpleRoot (version .1) that will do everything in just three steps.

So how have you and your rooted EVO been spending your time together? What's the best thing you've done so far?

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Jenn K. Lee

Jenn K. Lee is the founder of Pocketables. She loves gadgets the way most women love shoes and purses. The pieces in her tech wardrobe that go with everything are currently the Samsung Galaxy Note II, Sony Tablet P, and Nexus 7, but there are still a couple of vintage UMPCs/MIDs in the back of her closet.

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24 thoughts on “What are you doing with your rooted HTC EVO 4G?

  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    I rooted last week and have been playing with the abilities. Here’s a summary of what I’ve done, so far:

    – Removed all of the Sprint Bloatware (minus Sprint TV, which ROCKS for watching ESPN)
    – Added some better file explorers to allow me to control the widgets and such that are available.
    – Removed some of the crappy HTC apps that take up space and resources (like Peep, who really uses that?)
    – Tweaked what I let run, because I can now stop ANY app I want through OS Monitor (which I find to be better than Advanced Task manager)
    – Working to get “Autostarts” running properly on my machine, which will let me control exactly what gets to startup when I reboot my phone. (I will work with the developer to make this one happen, because it’s one of the best reasons to root)
    – Loaded a custom ROM (currently running DamageControl 3.1.2), though I have ROM Manager Premium installed for switching.
    – Loaded up a few different custom boot animations for fun, mostly just wanted to get rid of the noise that the default one makes on boot.
    – Titanium Backup. This made it all worth it. I can now backup my apps and most of my system settings.

    But the #1 reason for rooting:
    – ‘nandroid’ backups. This is what it’s all about for me. If I can regularly back up my phone (like I used to do with my BlackBerry), then I can never lose much. I’ve made backups every couple days, and any time I am flashing a new ROM of something, because storage is cheap, and bricking my phone is NOT an option. If you haven’t looked into the greatness that is nandroid backups, do it. That reason alone is worth the time and little trouble of rooting.

    Reply
  • whats the difference between nandroid’ backups and titanium backups .. and also the other 3rd party apps that can backup without root, sprite and mybackup?

    Reply
  • Avatar of android noob

    Will there be any issue when getting the official 2.2 update if you’ve already rooted?

    Reply
  • Nandroid backups back up your entire ROM, just like creating a System Restore point in Windows. For example, if you’re about to flash a new custom ROM to test out, you can create a Nandroid backup of your current ROM (including apps, config, i.e. EVERYTHING!), and then flash the new ROM. If you don’t like it, you can restore your old ROM, reboot and everything is back, as it was before

    Titanium Backup backs up your apps and user-specific data only. A nice benefit to using it with a newly flashed Custom ROM, is that you can easily restore your apps and data to a new install.

    Reply
  • I use root to get WiFi tethering without paying the $30 a month.

    For me, rooting is easy with a couple of programs that are available. I run “Unrevoked”, and then “Superuser Permissions”. After running those “Wireless Tether” runs perfectly.

    @Eric G, thanks for the info on Nandroid. Now I feel much safer messing with the ROM. I agree that Titanium Backup is great. I’ve been using it since the day I got my EVO, and it works perfectly.

    Reply
  • Would you happen to have a good link for the version of Nandroid you use? :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    A couple of follow-ups:

    @Dave – The nandroid app is built in to the Recovery apps I use (I am currently using ClockworkMod Recovery in conjunction with ROM Manager)

    @anthony & @Eric G – Eric hit the nail on the head, but I use the two of them together. That way I have good system restore points, but also a good backup of all my apps and data if I want to flash a new ROM. I have also donated to Titanium Backup to get the “Fast install”

    @android noob – There will be a delay (albeit slight) between the official release of Froyo for the Evo and the ROMs that will run it. BUT there are already ROMs that are built for the Evo running Froyo if you want them, though they are generally less stable, and don’t include Sense UI.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    In case you weren’t aware, Unrevoked doesn’t really get you REAL root. There are a lot of limitations that come with it, that you don’t have if you are truly rooted.

    Reply
  • Sorry I’m new to this but what is a ROM and what does it do?
    I’m looking to root for the tethering but I keep hearing about ROMS.
    Thanks for the help

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    A ROM is a pre-made software bundle. It replaces all of your system software through a “recovery” update. It lets you get custom features as well as potentially getting new releases early (like CyanogenMod’s Froyo).

    Reply
  • Charles, I’m new to rooting and everything that deals with android as well, do you have a twitter, email, or a blog where some of us can ask you some questions about all this?

    Much appreciated if so..

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    I do have all of those things, but with my new job have been woefully overworked. If you want to discuss rooting further, I’m on this forum:
    http://www.thehtcevoforum.com (Username: gtcompscientist)

    Feel free to send me a PM or post up your question for the membership at large.

    I plan on putting a writeup in there this weekend about my rooting experience.

    Reply
  • I just rooted my Evo friday night, and it took me all night because I’m new to Android and I wanted to read all the guides and all the forum posts to head off any potential mistakes and to set my mind at ease regarding not bricking my phone! I eventually went with the Idiot-proof Root guide written by TheBiles over on xda’s site. Imo it could be even more idiot-proof, but the pictures and illustrations are great and he really does a good job of holding your hand through the process. I’m running the Fresh Rom and I couldn’t be happier. It’s got a lot of optimizations built in to help with battery life and make apps run faster and smoother while taking up less space. Not to mention free 3g/4g tethering…Oh, one good reason to do it the long way is to learn about the process, so that when you go to flash a custom ROM you actually know what you’re doing. Also, I liked learning about ADB, and I had to marvel at it because accessing Symbian for unlocking and flashing was such a pain in the rear and ADB is so elegant and simple (and free!).

    Reply
  • Avatar of devastation

    free 3g/4g tethering is what got me is there a limit like with hot spot 8 devices ? and whats the speed compared to the hotspot app im sure there is alot of good reasons but $ 360.00 a year is the one for me

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    I am a hands-on kind of guy. And I SimpleRoot doesn’t actually get you as far as toastcfh’s 2 part method as far as I can tell.

    For me the entire rooting process took about 45 minutes to get as far as NAND unlock.

    Of course, I’m STILL playing with different ROMs and the like. ;)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    I haven’t seen what the limitations are for the Android Tether App, and I haven’t used for more than one device, so far. But the speed is whatever speed your phone gets. I was getting 2.5-3Mbps on 4G.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Angelo A.

    One question….can this phone be used on another carriers network like Virgin Mobile. I know Sprint owns Virgin Mobile and use the same network, but could I activate it and use my $25 plan which is unlimited with the EVO? I know i will not get 4G, but i don’t have it in my area any way. I’m sure there will be some features that only work with sprint service also…but to spend 70 bucks a month for the service compared to 25 is a no brainier.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Angelo A.

    I spoke with a VM CS rep and they said NO….even though they are owned by Sprint…they want you to use a VM phone. There has to be a work around. If you can use an iPhone on T-Mobile…then you should be able to do it here.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Charles Anderson

    I was confused. SimpleRoot does exactly what I did… only automated. I was thinking of Unrevoked… And I did mine BEFORE SimpleRoot was available.

    Reply
  • well the trick there would be that T-Mobile and ATT both use SIM cards, so to use an iPhone on T-Mobile all you had to do was jailbreak it. Sprint (and presumably VM) requires on-site activation, making it harder to get other carriers devices on there.

    …thats not to say it isnt possible though! just harder. go make friends with the guys at your local sprint store :P

    Reply
  • Yeah…I went to both Sprint and other stores that carry the EVO and they all told me the same thing. They said I could try…but Virgin Mobile will not allow it.

    Looks like I’m going to switch soon. I like the price of VM service…and even though they use Sprints network…the coverage sucks.

    Thanks for the reply!

    Reply

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