StreamTV’s Elocity A7 is rebranded Compal NAZ-10 for US

Streamtv_elocity_a7_1 

For our US-based readers following the emergence of Tegra 2 tablets from companies abroad (e.g., Pioneer Computers DreamBook ePad N7 from Australia and Japan's Toshiba SmartPad) and perhaps fearing the thought of expensive prices and shipping costs, Philadelphia-based StreamTV might just have the answer for you.

The company's recently revealed Elocity A7 tablet is another rebranded Compal NAZ-10 like the ePad N7 and Aigo N700, meaning it's got a 7-inch WVGA capacitive touch screen supporting multi-touch, Android OS, 512MB RAM, 1.3MP front-facing webcam, microSD support, USB and HDMI ports, WiFi, and the impressive Tegra 250 chipset powering proceedings with its 1GHz ARM Cortex-A9 core and nVidia GPU. Early impressions have been very positive with notes about smooth general performance and impressive 1080p video playback. Current prototypes are running Android 2.1, but StreamTV has stated the final version will be shipping with 2.2 Froyo in October. Best of all, unlike its other rebranded contemporaries, the A7 is set to be available on Amazon for a pretty reasonable $399, including an HDMI cable and wireless keyboard accessories. One downside is that the device, like many other tablets, won't have official access to Android Market due to Google's current hardware restrictions, with access to the GetJar app store as an alternative.

The launch of the Elocity A7 is a great development for the US tablet market and MID enthusiasts. Assuming it does indeed launch on time at the stated price, I think it could definitely make a splash, although it's a bit strange seeing the same design with so many brands on it! It's also very positive that the powerful Tegra 250 chipset is starting to get a foothold in the market, as I believe it is a superb choice of processor for tablet and MID devices with its combination of processing, graphics, and media capabilities.

[Engadget]
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Jeremy To

Jeremy is a former editor at Pocketables.