Help the EFF defend rooting smartphones, tablets, and game consoles

EffSection 1201 of the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA) states, "No person shall circumvent a technological measure that effectively controls access to a work protected under [copyright protection and management systems]." This is a law to stop people from trying to find a way around copyright protection.

But some device manufacturers believe that Section 1201 of the DMCA states that rooting/jailbreaking/general modding of smartphones is illegal. Yes, illegal. 

Now, we all know who bought this HTC EVO 4G and 3D that I possess. Me. Not HTC. Not Sprint. I'm the end user and I believe I should be able to do whatever I want with this phone.

As a matter of fact, in 2010, smartphone modding was deemed legal. Since then, us modders, themers, and developers have lived in peace. 

However, the bill that stated rooting was legal is about to expire. So the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), who protected Trevor Eckhart after he revealed the madness that ended up being Carrier IQ, is trying to get the bill protecting rooting renewed. Not only that, but they want to add tablets and video game consoles to the bill. 

If you would like to help, then heed the words of the EFF: "The Copyright Office needs to hear from people who depend on the ability to jailbreak to write, use, and/or tinker with independent software." If that's you and you feel like making a difference, here's the link

[Electronic Frontier Foundation]
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Sam Sarsten

Sam Sarsten is a former contributing editor at Good and EVO, which was merged with Pocketables in 2012.

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