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Beginner’s guide to Tasker, part 1: Tasker basics

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Update: This is the original first part of the beginner’s guide, and it covers Tasker from the viewpoint of the now old UI that’s only used on pre-ICS Android devices. An updated version of this guide is available here. As well as UI-related differences, the new version is also much newer in other ways, like references to other posts and examples. Pick the version of the guide that fits the version of Tasker you’re using, which depends on your Android version. 

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A part 0 has been added to the guide, talking about what Tasker is and how you can go about learning it. It’s available here. This part of the guide therefore jumps straight into talking about how Tasker itself works. 

Tasks, profiles, projects, contexts, scenes, variables, and actions

These seven terms are important to understand in order to use Tasker.

Actions

An action is the most basic part of Tasker, a thing that the app does. Switching off WiFi is an action, going back to the home screen is an action, starting Angry Birds is an action, turning down the media volume is an action. Tasker have over 200 basic actions, and most of them have configuration options that make them capable of doing different things, like how the Media Controls action has five different options for which button it should emulate. Linking actions together allows you to do some truly amazing things with Tasker, things that go far beyond changing a setting or two when you leave the house.

Tasks

Actions are grouped in tasks. As an example, my Outside task has three actions: One for setting screen brightness, one for alerting me of items in my shopping list, and one for updating an online status file to say that I’m not home. Tasks can also be triggered with actions, so that a task can have several actions that run individual tasks, each with their own actions. This way you can group actions together into more meaningful tasks, and it allows you to reference a set of actions from different tasks. For instance, I have a task with several actions that update a widget, and this widget update task is used as a part of other tasks where updating the widget is necessary, like my reboot profile. Tasks can be triggered either by contexts, or directly using shortcuts, widgets, and other methods.

Contexts and profiles

A context is a trigger. An incoming notification, the opening of an app, or connecting to a certain WiFi network are all examples of contexts which can be used to trigger a task. If you want the GPS to turn on when you leave the house, you could for instance use not being connected to your home WiFi as the context, and have that trigger a task with an action that turns on GPS.

Unlike tasks, contexts can’t “live on their own.” They’re always the first part of a profile, and a profile consists of up to four contexts and one or two tasks. A profile is what links tasks and contexts together, deciding which task should run when the context triggers. Depending on the type of context (state or event), a profile can be active continuously or only momentarily. In cases where there are multiple contexts in a single profile, the relationship between them is AND (e.g. context 1 and context 2), meaning that both contexts have to be fulfilled in order for the profile to trigger. If a mix of event and state contexts are used, the profile will follow event profile rules.

An example of a state context is being connected to your home WiFi connection, in which case the profile is active as long as you’re connected. In such cases, tasks can be either enter or exit tasks, which decides whether or not the task runs when the profiles becomes active (enter task) or when it deactivates (exit task). Some actions, specifically actions that change settings, automatically revert to their previous state when the profile deactivates, without the need to specify that in the exit task. An example is screen brightness, and if a profile’s enter task sets the screen brightness to 100%, it will automatically go back to the old value when the profile deactivates.

Update: Rich from the Tasker Google Group points out that the actual task connected to the state context-based profile only runs once – when the profile becomes active. This is true, and a very important point. A profile that has only state contexts will be active as long as the context is met, however, the enter task will only run once. This means that if you for instance set the screen brightness using the enter task of a state profile, it’s possible for other apps and Tasker tasks to change the screen brightness while the profile is still active, without the profile being aware of this. In other words, settings will only persists if nothing else tampers with them. That means that it’s really the exit task that is unique with state context based profiles, as well as the ability to revert some settings automatically when the profile becomes inactive. 

Another important thing to be aware of is that an exit task can sometimes run before the same profile’s entry task, if that entry task has a Wait action that delays part of the entry task for so long that the profile becomes inactive. 

In an event profile, on the other hand, there is no continuous state. Receiving an SMS message is an example of an event context, triggering the profile momentarily to make the attached task run once. Such profiles can’t have exit tasks since there is no time difference between when the profile activates and deactivates (there’s no practical difference between when you start receicing an SMS message and you’re finished receiving it). Furthermore, it’s impossible to have more than a single event context attached to a profile. The reason is that since an event context by definition lasts only a split second, and the relationship between contexts is AND, having two event profiles would make the profile trigger only when two split second events occur at the exact same time, which isn’t likely to ever happen.

When an event context is used together with state contexts in the same profile, the profile becomes an event profile, like I mentioned above. In those cases, the profile triggers momentarily when the event happens, but only if the state contexts are fulfilled. For instance, you could have a profile with an SMS received event and a WiFi Connected state for your work’s WiFi network in order to automate what happens when you receive an SMS message at work.

You can also have up to four state contexts in a profile without an event context, in which case the profile is still a state profile. All the state conditions then have to be fulfilled for the profile to be active.

Variables

A variable is like a virtual text file within Tasker, or like a variable in math. A variable is represented by a % symbol followed by a name, like for instance %Variable1. Variables are used to get access to system information, transfer information between parts of Tasker, and even work as settings and options. The variable %DATE will for instance always be the current date, so if you were to tell Tasker to create a notification with the text %DATE, then %DATE would be replaced by the actual date when the notification appears. I’ll go into this in much greater detail later.

Scenes

A scene is essentially a customized user interface. You can user Tasker’s scene functionality to create menus, pop-ups, settings boxes, and much more. This is a very useful and complex feature that I will also cover in greater detail later.

Projects

A project is the final grouping in Tasker. Think of it as a folder capable of holding all of the above, so that you can keep everything related to a specific Tasker system in one place. The more complex Tasker setups often use multiple profiles, multiple tasks, and even multiple scenes all working together. You can group all of those together in a single project to stay organized.

The Tasker screen

Tasker has a beginner mode that is designed to make the app easier to use for beginners, by disabling certain features. Unfortunately, this sometimes causes problems because you end up having people refer to features that aren’t visible in someone else’s Tasker. As such, I’ll be basing this guide on the normal Tasker look, not beginner mode. To deactivate beginner mode, go to Tasker preferences (by clicking the menu button on your device), the UI tab, and uncheck beginner mode.

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Knowing the difference between the various terms I explained above is half the battle when it comes to understanding how the UI works. The image above should help explain what everything is, but there are a few things I want to point out. The arrow you need to drag to hide/show the project tabs can be very hard to see, and very hard to grab even if you do see it. If you don’t see the top row of tabs from above, it’s because it’s hidden, and you need to try to find that arrow if you want to use projects to organize everything.

The icons next to profiles indicate whether a task is enabled. A green check mark means that it’s enabled, the red circle with a line going through it means it’s disabled. I point this out because some think the symbol indicates what will happen when you press it, not the current state. In the image above, you hence see one disabled profile and three enabled ones.

The single profile whose name is green above (Home) is currently active. A profile being active means that its context conditions are met, like if you have a location based profile and is currently at that location. That profile would then be inactive if you leave the location. If it’s disabled however, it won’t ever become active no matter if the context conditions are met. Profiles which contain event contexts cannot be continuously active in this way, as mentioned above, but then can be disabled to prevent them from triggering.

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that holding down on parts of the UI is the way to access a lot of features. It’s the way to import and export items, add more contexts to a profile, switch out tasks, turn enter tasks into exit tasks (or vice versa), and so on. Also, to delete items, you grab the right part of the screen besides their name (where the enable/disable icons ae for profiles) and drag them down to the trash can that appears. This is also how you sort items and transfer them to other projects: drag and drop.

What Tasker requires to work

When Tasker is active, there will be a constant notification icon present in your notification bar. This is to make sure the system will never close Tasker, as Tasker obviously needs to run at all times to work. This notification also shows which profiles are currently active, which is a quick way to keep track of your state profiles.

Some features in Tasker, specifically the ability to read notifications from other apps, require that Tasker has accessibility access. This is a system-level access that you have to manually give to Tasker by going to the device’s main system settings, accessibility section. I have this enabled in order to let Tasker see notifications from Gmail and run a task based on them.

Tasker also requires device administrator privileges for certain features, like manipulating the status of the lock code. This also has to be enabled manually, and if you do enable it, you will have to manually disable it to uninstall Tasker. This is another system level Android thing that you can read more about here.

Being rooted is not required for Tasker, but it does give it more abilities. The availability of certain actions and contexts is dependent on the device and software version/ROM, and being rooted can unlock features that are otherwise unavailable on a certain device. Tasker can also use root to kill apps, manipulate files, and so on.

There are dozens of plug-ins for Tasker, giving Tasker lots of new abilities. These plug-ins are available in the Play Store, and install as normal apps. Tasker shares the plug-in system with another automation app, Locale, and so many Tasker-compatible plug-ins are listed as Locale plug-ins. Furthermore, some apps have Tasker compatibility built in, meaning that installing the main app also unlocks the plug-in components in Tasker. The plug-ins can be accessed from either the third party or plug-in parts of Tasker (in the list of other actions/contexts) depending on whether the plug-in was built into Tasker or got installed on the side. If the accompanying app is installed, there’s no practical difference between actions listed in the third party section and those listed in the plug-in section, other than the name of the category they’re listed in.

Creating your first profile

The best way to learn Tasker is to tinker with it and explore. The configuration for each context, each action is different, and so it’s hard to generalize. The image below explains some of the buttons and options that are fairly common in the configuration screen for actions, while skipping those that are more unique to that particular task. Each action and context has different options however, and with the amount of contexts and actions in Tasker, explaining each and every one is a massive task.

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There is however documentation for more or less all the features and settings in Tasker, and you can access this documentation by clicking the question mark icon present in the bottom right corner of many of the configuration screens in Tasker. You then get a brief explanation of the screen you’re on. It’s not always easy to understand the explanation, and there have been some (valid) complaints about the documentation for Tasker, but it’s still your very best friend when exploring Tasker.

The truth is that learning Tasker involves a fair bit of self study. This article, and future ones in this series, will cover how to use Tasker in general. Taking that and turning it into the specific profiles you need however requires some trial and error.

The video below shows the creation of a simple state profile with an enter task and (later) an exit task. My advise is to play around with the various contexts and actions and see what happens.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask. I’m also open to user requests for specific profiles/tasks which I can then create as examples in future parts of this series. You can also check out the Tasker tag for more articles on Tasker, but as those are written without beginners in mind, they might confuse more than anything.

Part 2 of this guide is now available here, and there are 7 parts to this guide in total. Find the complete list here

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Download: Google Play

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Andreas Ødegård

Andreas Ødegård is more interested in aftermarket (and user created) software and hardware than chasing the latest gadgets. His day job as a teacher keeps him interested in education tech and takes up most of his time.

Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

74 thoughts on “Beginner’s guide to Tasker, part 1: Tasker basics

  • Avatar of D. Stroya

    Thanks so much for the guide! I picked up Tasker due to your posts and have been loving it, but the documentation is …dense. I didn’t even know Projects existed until today. My screen is so much less cluttered now. Keep up the good work and thanks for helping people like me climb up and over that steep learning curve!

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Glad it helped you out! It took me forever to find the projects feature too, and I had misconceptions about what scenes were for quite a while. Thought I’d start out by getting all the terms straight

      Reply
  • I’ll be keeping my eye on this blog:

    I would really love to be more educated on veriables and such, I freak out when I see for example: “%LOCSPDMPH” I would like to not only know what I am looking at when I see something with a “%” but how to use it, and how to create my own. I’ve learned how to creat simple things like (laucnh wifi, screen rotate, and turn brightness up when I launch apps that I use these things for) but I dont know how to go about the more advanced stuff. for example: Auto reply when driving, (it’s a script you can download and import) however I would like to know how to make my own! :-)

    Also, I am a graphics artist and desktop publishing expert, and have many MANY friends in book publishing, if you do a good enough “for dummies” kind of book, I could help you put it together, and publish it?

    contact me if interested.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Variables will be its own part of this guide. I was confused about that at first too, even afraid of them, but then I gradually started understanding the concept and the power of what you can do with them. All the different uses is why it will be its own full article.

      That’s a great offer with making a book, though I doubt my musings will ever be good enough for that :) in any case, it would be an amazingly niche book :D

      Reply
  • The very first picture you have on the left hand side. it shows the house, and tabs behind it, “projects” Mine does not have this, how do I go about setting up the tabs?

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Check out the first image with the red text and pointers. It points to the tiny, almost invisible arrow you need to grab hold of an pull to make those visible

      Reply
      • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

        Paragraph above “What Tasker requires to work” ;) Simple drag and drop, grabbing the right side of the item line and dropping it in other projects

        Reply
        • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

          Lots of info and easy to miss some. I’m not the biggest fan of that way of moving stuff myself, I accidentally drag stuff all over the place at times – especially actions within tasks, rearranging stuff accidentally so it doesn’t work anymore. Can’t even count how many times I’ve had to cancel my way out of Tasker in order to restore things

          Reply
  • Avatar of Guthrie

    I’ve been waiting for you to write this, I’ve slowly been making my way through your older posts on the subject. This will be much more logical in order, please thanks.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Yeah it’s been a bit of a mess. I started writing about Tasker before I fully understood Tasker (though I guess I still don’t have 100% control over everything), resulting in me skipping the part where I write a guide from start. Been meaning to get that fixed and finally jumped into it. Plan is to try to create an overview of older posts later on when the guide is done, and use the guide as a staring point to link back to for other articles.

      Reply
  • Is there a way to get a list of features ONLY available for rooted phones?

    Don’t wanna buy this if the cool features needs root :)

    Nice guide btw!

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      I’m not aware of any lists, but if you have anything specific in mind I can check it out for you. I should note though that I didn’t root my phone until well after I wrote many of the Tasker articles on this site, and I have to say that I can’t think of anything specific that I couldn’t do before.

      Reply
  • Avatar of Alfonso

    Thanks, I normally use it to keep the screen on if I’m on Google Maps.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Rebecca

    Ok… so my first attempt is a mess. I set up a profile called good morning. The context is started at x time – no end time because I was going to manually shut it off. The first task starts pandora. The second turns media volume all the way up. The next kicks of a scene which is a display with good morning text on a background. – the display is a blocking overlay… I tested after each step – Great! all the way until the display… the display makes manual shut off impossible: no big deal right? just reboot… can’t reboot because you have to select restart or shut down: fine – I take out the battery. But whenever it comes back on it automatically kicks the profile back on. I’m completely locked out! Help??

    Reply
    • Avatar of Rebecca

      Ok so I fixed it but only by getting in and deleting the last task before the phone fully booted. Whew.

      Reply
      • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

        Yeah that’s pretty much the way to do it (that or turning off tasker quickly). For the record though, Tasker has a fail safe for this type of situation built in: By default, all scenes display with a close button in the bottom right corner. You have to manually disable this button, which will then warn you about potential consequences if I’m no mistaken. I thought I had included a paragraph about this option in part 3 of the guide, but I can’t find it now, so I guess I had only planned to do it.

        Reply
  • Avatar of Oliver

    Thanks for this well-written guide. I’ve been using Tasker for a while but continue to learn new things about it all the time. I’m just about to look at parts 2 and 3.

    Reply
  • Avatar of ronald

    I love Tasker !
    I puchased it and am wondering if one of the action could be to input the password used to lock my galaxy S3 ?
    Thank’s in advance

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Do you mean the password used to UNlock the phone? As in disable the lock screen? If so, there’s a dedicated option in there to disable the lock screen altogether. Many people use it for creating profiles where they don’t have to unlock the phone in certain situations, like at home or in the office. The option is under Display, and is called Keyguard. There’s also a plugin called Secure Settings which allows you to do it. I know the feature hasn’t been all that stable in the past, so I don’t use it myself, but I haven’t looked into it in a while and not tried the Secure Settings version. There’s been a lot of discussion about this particular use on ICS and above (see the Tasker google grou at https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/tasker) so you’ll likely find some info and tricks if you look around a bit.

      Reply
  • Avatar of Jake

    Dear Andreas,
    Great site. I’m new to Tasker and indeed Android, and probably a bit thick too. I tried to do something very simple so I set up a Profile called ‘Office Mode’ and a Context ‘From 09:10 Till 17:01’ and set up a Task called ‘Vibrate On’ and the exit task as ‘Vibrate Off’. All I want the phone to do is to swtich to vibrate mode between the hours of 9:10 to 17:01. The Notification says it is running but I get the same sounds as I usually get – so when an email comes through, I am expecting the phone to vibrate but I get a bell.

    I think I’m doing something fundamentally wrong (or not doing something fundamental). Can you help on this trival matter please?

    Thanks,

    Jake.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      What’s the name of the action you’re using in the enter and exit task? There’s an action called Vibrate, but it’s for actually making the phone vibrate – independently from whether or not it produces sound. The action you want to use is in the Audio Settings category, and is called Silent Mode. This one has three settings, on/off/vibrate. I know that on some devices, you need to use “”vibrate” instead of “on” to get it to work. It might very well be that other devices requires you to use “on” instead of “vibrate”. Also, I know there’s a discussion topic about silent mode not working on the Galaxy S III in the Tasker google group.

      Did any of that solve your problem?

      Reply
  • Avatar of Jake

    Dear Andreas,

    Thank you. I was not using Silent Mode. Now I’ve switched from using Vibrate to Silent Mode it seems to be working. Thank you. I have the Galaxy SII and I’ll look up the Tasker google group.

    Thanks once again.

    Jake

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      The SII works fine (I have it too), it’s the S III that has problems. For the record, Vibrate is an action meant to allow you to literally make the thing vibrate. I use it in a profile where I turn Gmail notifications into 3 long 1 second vibrates in order to better be able to feel it in my pocket.

      Reply
  • Avatar of Jake

    Sorry, I meant Galaxy S III.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Jake

    Dear Andreas,

    I’ve created a new Project (called ‘Office Mode’), but my Profile is in the Home tab. Is there a way to move the Profile from my Home tab to the new tab I have just created?

    Thank you.

    Jake

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Grab the icon next to it and drop it into the new tab :)

      Reply
  • Avatar of Jake

    Thanks Andreas. I did warn you I was probably a bit thick …. Perhaps you can take this as confirmation.

    Regards,

    Jake

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Nah, people have been missing both those tabs and how to move stuff there since the beginning of time :D took me months to even realize there were project tabs xD Not to mention I thought “cut” was the only way to remove stuff for a while, until I realized a garbage can appeared if I grabbed a task/profile

      Reply
  • Avatar of Craco

    Tank you for your guide and sorry for my english, I am italian.
    Is it possible to detect an event like OnMMSArrived?
    I better explain what I would do:
    Normally I haven’t DATA ON for saving battery and I’d like to start connection automatically when an MMS arrived, retrieve it and then stop the DATA connection when retrieved.
    Is it possible with tasker? ..I didn’t see this event..
    TIA

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      It might go under the Text Received, but I haven’t tried. Alternatively, if the MMS creates a unique notification, you can try using the Notification event context

      Reply
  • Avatar of Andreas

    dear Andreas
    great howto!

    I have a question, let me explain in steps:
    – I have a task that waits for 1 minute and switches off moblie data
    – this task is used in the exit of the profile “display on”
    – I like to activate mobile data manually, but I want to be sure that it goes off after 1 minute of inacitvity, but not if I reactivate it before this time
    – if I just switch off the display and wait for a minute, mobile data is off, well.
    – but if I reactivate the display before one minute, the task is still running and mobile data goes off after the remaining time…

    my question: how could I do this better?

    thanks for your help
    Andreas

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Check out part 5 of the guide, which is the tips and tricks part. It has the solution to this exact problem towards the end of the article :)

      Reply
  • Avatar of Andreas

    thanks a lot, I just found the text you mentioned myself!
    I will test it in a silent moment, I hope it works that easy as it sounds :-)
    ha de bra
    Andreas

    Reply
  • Avatar of EnthusiasticStudent

    Thanks for creating this guide. It will definitely help!

    Reply
  • Avatar of Ian Williams

    As usual, it’s the first hurdle that’s the highest.
    “To deactivate beginner mode, go to Tasker preferences (by clicking the menu button on your device), the UI tab, and uncheck beginner mode”. OK, the little green tick goes grey, but how do I keep it so? Anythin I do to get out of the preferences screen seems to turn it green again the next time I look. How doe I save that preference? The obvious way, with the other little green tick at the bottom left doesn’t do it.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      That’s a bug in the latest Tasker. Download the beta version from here http://tasker.dinglisch.net/beta.html
      and install over the one you have (make sure to pick the right download for whether you bought from the market or directly from the developer).

      Reply
  • I am using openvpn. I’ve automated the script so when i open the openvpn ap, and click on the OpenVPN check box on the far right of the screen, it automatically launches my configuration file, calls the pass.txt file, registers my username/passowrdf and connects. how can i use tasker as a widget to automate the checking of the box after i open the app openvpn? i am rooted, i have tasker listed as a device admin, and i have been reading up on this for weeks. i am usually not this lost, but tasker is one app that frustrates me! thanks in advance for your help!

    Reply
  • Avatar of Shiva

    I need some help here..

    I have a tasker profile which turns 3G on and off based on screen display and also checks in background..
    Here is the profile:

    When Display State is Off
    and Profile Active is NOT Home
    Wait 5 mins If %BATT > 20
    Wait 2 mins If %BATT < 20
    STOP If %BATT < 10
    Then Disable Mobile Data APN

    Exit Task:
    Wait 5 seconds
    Enable Mobile Data APN

    I also have a Check in background setup

    From 6am till 2am every 10 mins
    and Display State is Off
    and Profile Active is NOT Home
    Enable Mobile Data APN

    the above setup does not seem to work properly, every now and then I see tasks running together or tasks getting aborted. I tried many combinations but none seem to work 1000%

    Reply
  • You, my dear sir are one of the smartest ppl on the internet!! No, I mean it.

    Incredibly well written article! I also read your articles on “how to customize your android phone”, which also, was extremely well constructed.
    It is not just the huge amount of knowledge in each of these articles but also the way you have organized them in a systematic way that makes reading them a pleasure.

    Keep up the good work!

    P.S. Is there a way to get an alert when you write a new article? I clicked on the “subscribe” link above and it seems to be broken.

    P.S.S. Would also like to see some of your more advanced profiles on tasker.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Thank you for the praise! The subscribe link under my author info works, at least in the RSS readers I’ve tried. Putting that into something like IFTTT.com gives you actual alerts, whereas using it in e.g. Google Reader gives you the feed. Direct link to just my posts is http://pocketables.com/author/andreas-odegard/.

      As for more advanced profiles, I have literally dozens upon dozens of Tasker articles on the site. This guide alone is 7 parts so far. Follow the Tags in the article to get them all :)

      Reply
      • Cool! Thanks :)
        7 parts u say? I only found the 2 of them :o
        Will check the rest of them out.

        After reading your article today I tried to setup another profile and I was hoping to get ur opinion (I know, typical reader asking for help ryt).
        Anyway, if u can answer it’d b gr8.

        So, I am trying to unlock device using proximity sensor. Basically if I pick the phone from my desk I want it to unlock.
        I have set the context up for proximity sensor and am using widget locker so I just say unlock as the action.

        But unfortunately this only works when the screen is on.
        Could this be because the phone automatically goes to some sort of sleep mode and tasker events dont get recognized if the screen is off?
        Anyway around this that u can think off?

        (Again sorry for bothering u with this; its just annoying that I cant get this done)

        Reply
        • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

          If you follow the tag for the guide you will find all of them :)

          The proximity sensor doesnt work with the acreen off my design. It would drain the battery, not to mention it would turn the phone on in your pocket :)

          Reply
          • ya, but I was only doing it bcos its fun :) and I’m sure some of my friends wud b impressed if I cud do it tht way

  • Oh and by the way, was your series on android customization cut short in between?
    I probably wont change my setup right now (spent an entire week customizing to get here :) ), but it wud make an interesting read and I cud always refer to it wen i am looking to change

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      It was cut short due to lack of response. I considered starting it back up again but the view counts arent in its favor

      Reply
  • Thank you for creating this guide. I just found it and am beginning to read through it all now. I must say that I have been extremely frustrated with my inability to create a single task with this app in the months that I’ve had it. I bought it due to its apparent tremendous potential, based on the reviews of others. I guess I just can’t figure it out (at all) on my own.

    The first thing I’d like to be able to do is create a widget to delete all of my text message threads.

    Reply
  • Avatar of shri

    Thanks Andreas for this guide. I’m still getting the hang of using the android device and the capabilities of it. BTW could you please show me the direction i’m trying to unlock a specific app every time (15 mins once) it locks using tasker?

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Could you rephrase that question? I don’t understand what you’re asking

      Reply
      • Avatar of shri

        I have an app that is password protected. It locks itself every I lock the phone. Would like to use tasker to unlock the app (using the password) everytime I unlock the phone.

        Reply
        • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

          That’s not possible unless the app is designed to let Tasker do it. You could potentially set Tasker to open the app and then use various input actions (on rooted devices) to input the password etc, but it would essentially be like doing it manually, just without actually typing yourself. There’s no way to just tap into an app’s security system in the background

          Reply
          • Avatar of shri

            oops. K thanks for the quick response. I guess i’m stuck with manually entering the password for now :(

  • Avatar of shri

    Also forgot to mention that the phone lock password is different and the app password is different. That is why i would like to use tasker profile to unlock the app. Thanks

    Reply
  • Hi, Andreas, what can I do to make that phone was connected by bluetooth to Volvo when I start the car?
    And when I leave Volvo my phone is disconnected.
    I didn’t conect to dock in my car.

    Happy new year

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      I’ve never dealt with automatic Bluetooth connections, but I know it’s a hot topic, so if you search the tasker google group I’m sure you’ll find some helpful pointers

      Reply
  • Avatar of Philippe

    Your guide has been precious to me. I’ve dicovered the project tab… reading your posts. Now, i’m stuck in the exporting process of my project. Where is the exported project app?? Can’t find the app nor an exported file. Waiting for your help now.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Inside the Tasker/factory/kids folder on your internal memory :)

      Reply
  • Avatar of Philippe

    Do I need a special file explorer ? I can’t see “Tasker/factory” folder. All i have in Tasker is: “auto-import, cache, log, profiles, userguide”.

    I did reboot after factory installation… check.
    Hidden files are shown… check.

    Could export process failed?

    I did fill all required fields “Package, version name, launch Task”. Then I click on the green check. It closes this active window. It shows a popup on the center of the screen, so fast that I can’t see it… I thought that it was a confirmation notification. Now, I think more of an error message… Is there a log

    Should I expect a confirmation popup after “export as App” successfully completes?

    Should I find the exported profile somewhere in Tasker?

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      Sounds like you have a bug, as you should see that folder if a file was created. After export you should also get a menu to install the app etc. I’d try contacting the developer. Make sure you have the latest version of both the app factory and tasker first, though, as I think export support for certain android versions was just added a couple of weeks ago

      Reply
  • Avatar of Philippe

    I’m impressed… You where right, Tasker need to be updated. Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  • Avatar of Brooke

    I have had Tasker for almost six months and can only get two profiles to work. I tried a couple different ways to create a profile that turns on my wifi at home which would enable my lockscreen to turn off once connected to my home wifi. I could never get the wifi on/ off to work so I reverted back to just keeping wifi on all the time. Even when I am at home for hours, my lockscreen off profile only works intermittently, and always seems to turn back on my lockscreen after a while. Also, I am trying to figure out if Tasker can make one app open another. For example, I want to be able to click on my android stock messaging app and have it actually open go small pro. Is there a way to do this? Any help on these tasks would be much appreciated because I have just about given up even tho I know how great Tasker can be.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Tom Oglesby

    Is there a way to have Tasker automatically respond to a text message when you are driving. The response would be something like “I am driving right now; I will check my messages when I stop”.

    Reply
  • Tasker has easily become my favorite app, but it’s also very frustrating to use sometimes, but I blame that on my lack of experience.

    I’m having an issue getting Tasker to check off a box in an app. I’m trying to have it load an app, press dpad down 2 times and then press the button which should check off the box that I want, but it’s not checking it off. Any suggestions on how I can get it to check off that box.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Immunitas

    Thank you for this great article. I’ve been using tasker on my i9300 for 8-10 days and it is really a great software. Your guides are very well organized. Thank you for your time and efforts. Keep up the good work! :)

    Reply
  • Great article. Any chance you will have an update including the new screenshots from the latest Tasker app version?

    Reply
    • Avatar of Andreas Ødegård

      It’s on my todo list to get at least the first part of the guide updated with screenshots. For most parts of the guide though, the different UI shouldn’t cause any issues

      Reply
  • Avatar of Anand A

    HI,

    I am trying to use the tasker for monitoring my email. I look for a specific subject from one single email id. When ever I get a specific email id it should set me a ring tone. I am able to set the ring tone but not able to understand how to use the variable and the text.

    For ex if I get an email say [email protected] with a message as “New critical event” or “Event changed to critical” I should get an alarm beeping continuously.

    Can you please help writing the profile? I am not able to find any documentation on writing these. But tried to use the online resources.

    Regards
    Anand

    Reply
  • Thanks a lot for this excellent article. Like another commenter before I was not even aware of the Projects :)

    I am just starting with Tasker (moving from on{x}) and I am trying to understand how to edit an existing profile to add exit tasks. I created a profile (which works fine) but fail to find how to add something in it (I tried to long press, configuration button, etc.). This is the “Home Exit” in your example

    Would you have an idea? :)

    Also: is there a way to edit the configurations directly (in a file) without using the GUI (it would be much faster once the syntax is known)

    Thank you!

    Reply
  • Hardware settings that allows your cpu go at the finest.

    Pay attention to that window, it’s there for a reason. The need to have antivirus protection is understood enough by the general population that it is an almost reflexive action to buy the latest premium antivirus software at the same time the new computer is bought and paid for.

    Reply
  • Hello Andre, can i get tasker to notify me how long it has been since i launched a task?
    example: i touch a scene button that activates a task , after activation 10 seconds pass by, i need a notification to know if 10 seconds passed already, help please?

    Reply

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