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Google builds new experimental wireless network – Could this be the start of Google Wireless?

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Earlier this month, Google filed paperwork with the FCC to build a secret LTE wireless network on its Mountain View campus in California, which covers a radius of about two miles. The network will consist of 50 base stations, operating in the 2.5GHz frequency band – the same spectrum that Clearwire uses. Up to 200 “user devices” will initially be allowed on this network.

Obviously, this puts a whole new spin on rumors that have been swirling around for a long time concerning a possible Google foray into wireless service. What’s interesting about this latest finding, though, is that it appears Google might be partnering with Clearwire, since it’s using spectrum that almost no other carrier in the world has. It is highly unlikely that Google would be building devices that use this specific and obscure spectrum, unless Google was planning on doing something big with it.

A Google-Clearwire partnership might also throw a huge kink into Sprint’s plans to acquire a 100% stake in Clearwire. However, at the same time, Dish did outbid Sprint, and Dish and Google were said to be in talks about a possible partnership. Could this latest FCC filing be a sign of things starting to fall in place for Google’s potential new wireless service?

The fact of the matter is this: We just don’t know yet. Until an official announcement is made, all we can do is speculate. But this certainly seems very intriguing, doesn’t it?

[The Verge]
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John F

John was the editor-in-chief at Pocketables. His articles generally focus on all things Google, including Chrome and Android, although his love of new gadgets and technology doesn't stop there. His current arsenal includes the Nexus 6 by Motorola, the 2013 Nexus 7 by ASUS, the Nexus 9 by HTC, the LG G Watch, and the Chromebook Pixel, among others.

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4 thoughts on “Google builds new experimental wireless network – Could this be the start of Google Wireless?

  • Avatar of Kishan Patel

    Reading this, my only reaction was “L:HSE{YIEOTYDKL!”

    This will be quite an interesting tale once it’s through and through.

    Reply
  • It’s possible, since they are also trying to become an ISP and TV service (https://fiber.google.com/about/). Why not bundle in cell too? Their ISP/fiber service is very interesting; You have a free internet option, which requires a $300 one time fee. While the speeds aren’t the fiber speeds, it’s a very appealing option for people like my mom, who doesn’t consume a lot of online content.

    That being said, I wonder if they’ll re-invent pricing for cell phone plans. Would they end up offering a free service, with some sort of catch?

    Of course, there’s also the possibility that they want to experiment with improving cell service in general. If they have their own test signals/network, they could play with audio compressions, or other methods to provide content delivery, that you wouldn’t be able to test on a live system. Not likely, but who knows with Google ;)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Kortez

    Ever since I got my MyTouch in ’08 I knew this was gonna be the end of big time carriers all they need is there own network and that’s it. Google is doing exactly what I want them to do in terms of EVOLVING. Whatever they introduce I’m wit it #androidjunkie

    Reply
  • Avatar of Michael Perry

    Isn’t Sprint the only carrier that integrated features of their network, like Google Voice and your carrier number, with one another. Them using Clear wire spectrum and Sprint buying that company may be the beginning of a Sprint/Google integration. Kansas City is the only city I’m aware of that has the Google high speed fiber network, and that’s Sprints headquarters. Any thoughts?

    Reply

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