WiFi Radiation Meter gives hint at exposure

WiFi Radiation MeterWiFi Radiation Meter is an interesting application that attempts to measure the effective radiation you’re being exposed to by being in a WiFi hotspot. It’s currently in beta, but it can give you an indication of where your risk of WiFi radiation exposure is highest.

I’ll give you a hint – it gets over acceptable levels in the US at about two to three feet to an access point. Acceptable levels are guessed at by country from what I can tell.

Every step you take away from the access point the levels drop markedly because you’ve got a signal beaming in all directions.

WRM will access your general location and figure out what the acceptable levels of exposure are for your country so you know if you’ve potentially got an environmental issue.

While WiFi Radiation Meter’s accuracy is extremely questionable given the differences in WiFi chips and antennas from one device to another, the basic assumptions are the same, and you can see that a few feet away from most devices you’re well within established acceptable exposure limits, which unfortunately are mostly guessed at as far as I can tell.

Should be noted that WiFi Radiation Meter probably is only going to test for whatever WiFi band your device is capable of (2.4/5ghz) and maybe only one at a time – there’s not really any documentation on it.

WiFi Radiation Meter is a hypochondriac’s dream application, assuming they claim to be affected by absurdly low levels of radiation. Ignore anyone who claims it’s accurate and doesn’t provide a model of 2.4ghz radiation detector they used to determine the accuracy and you should be set. Use it as a ballpark figure and you’re golden.

While questionable results and ever more questionable country determinations as to what’s safe, it’s an interesting tool and can either give you the assurance you need that you’re not getting radiation poisoning, or the proof you require that the neighbors are making you sick with a flatulent WiFi access point.

It also won’t monitor radiation in other bands, Microwaves in the general vicinity, nearby radio stations, Bluetooth, visible spectrum radiation, etc.

Download: Google Play

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Paul E King

Paul King started with GoodAndEVO in 2011, which merged with Pocketables, and as of 2018 he's evidently the owner. He lives in Nashville, works at a film production company, is married with two kids. Facebook | Twitter | Donate | More posts by Paul | Subscribe to Paul's posts