Proofpoint Cybersecurity Coloring Book fails to explain print spooler privilege escalation

Proofpoint has released their summer printable Proofpoint Cybersecurity Coloring Book and left my children without adequate explanations of CVE-2021-34527, any refreshers on perhaps the first Exchange vulnerability my 5yo will have worked at exploiting (talking of course CVE-2021-26855,) or even referenced throwbacks to the summer of TCP/IP stack attacks.

I mean my kids got “Whalescan” obviously, but what’s the connection to Proofpoint?
Thunderbolt firmware hack, sandpit, a throwback to CVE-2019-12889

Page after page of coloring options and not even a coded reference to the RDP exploits hackers used late 2020 to install ransomware everywhere? Requests to stay hydrated and wear sunscreen? Do they not want my child to be in cybersecurity dehydrated on 11 cups of coffee and pale as the driven snow?

Good advice, my 8 year old saw this as the only real lesson “anyone who has access to your tech has can test your defenses” – she did not catch the ancient Btrieve sort reference in the background which might be a bit too much for kiddos these days.
What is this? The Numa Exploit wasn’t even a real exploit. Teaching the kids fairy tales?

The coloring book is free for download without requiring any identifying information on Proofpoint’s website, however contains no modern cybersecurity practices and standards that my kindergartner, let along my 2nd grader, should be following. Man, there’s not even a good buffer overflow picture in there for the pre-K crowd.

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Paul E King

Paul King started with GoodAndEVO in 2011, which merged with Pocketables, and as of 2018 he's evidently the owner. He lives in Nashville, works at a film production company, is married with two kids. Facebook | Twitter | Donate | More posts by Paul | Subscribe to Paul's posts