Why are some basic features missing on the ASUS Transformer Pad Infinity?

After I upgraded from the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer Prime (TF201) to the Transformer Pad Infinity (TF700), I began to notice that some very basic features were missing from the newer, supposedly better Infinity tablet. The two biggest missing features for me are:

  • Face Unlock, which is a standard feature of Android 4.0, Ice Cream Sandwich, is missing. This security feature worked flawlessly on my Transformer Prime – albeit after an update that enabled it, after about six  months of no Face Unlock on Ice Cream Sandwich.
  • Users are unable to lock the navigation bar. This is a critical feature for gamers, and again was standard on the Transformer Prime, along with other tablets in ASUS’s Transformer lineup.

Upon researching this a little further, I found that there are a few other miscellaneous features missing on the Transformer Pad Infinity, much to the annoyance of users:

  • WiFi Direct doesn’t work.
  • There is no native Bluetooth support for PS3 game controllers.
  • HDMI over DVI does not work.
  • Some people report an inability to change the mouse pointer shape, even though this is an option on mine.

The Transformer Pad Infinity is supposed to be one of the best Android tablets out there: it’s got top-of-the-line specs, a full HD display (arguably one of the best out there), and a ton of awesome games thanks to its NVIDIA Tegra 3 processor. So why was it released like this when its lesser-speced siblings already have these features enabled?

Historically, all of these features weren’t always available on all of the Transformer lineup from day one; many of them became available through OTA updates after the initial release. But the fact that the Transformer Prime got Face Unlock in June, and the Transformer Pad Infinity was released after that, is inexcusable.

This is not to mention that the TF300 – even lower on the specs totem pole than the Transformer Prime – already has Jelly Bean, while Transformer Prime and Transformer Pad Infinity users are still waiting. Normally, ASUS is applauded for speedy bug fixes and quick software updates, but in the case of the Infinity, I have yet to be satisfied.

Hopefully, ASUS will release an update soon that will make all of my points moot. Until then, the clock is ticking.

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John F

John was the editor-in-chief at Pocketables. His articles generally focus on all things Google, including Chrome and Android, although his love of new gadgets and technology doesn't stop there. His current arsenal includes the Nexus 6 by Motorola, the 2013 Nexus 7 by ASUS, the Nexus 9 by HTC, the LG G Watch, and the Chromebook Pixel, among others.