Could Key Lime Pie be delayed in order for manufacturers to catch up?

Key Lime Pie - for some reason we don't have an alt tag hereRumors are swirling around that Android 5.0 (or 4.3, or whatever the next version of Android ends up being) might be delayed this year in order to give manufacturers some extra time to catch up. This is according to “reliable” sources at Google, who say that Key Lime Pie won’t make an appearance at Google I/O in May after all, in spite of much speculation to the contrary.

These sources indicate that Key Lime Pie will be delayed 2-4 months, while manufacturers like HTC, Samsung, LG, and others scramble to update as many phones as they can to Jelly Bean.

In essence, what this means is that carriers and manufacturers who drag their feet on updates aren’t only affecting those who use their devices, but everyone else who uses Android, as well. How fair does it seem that those of us with a Nexus phone or tablet have to wait up to 120 more days, just because HTC still has too many phones running Gingerbread or Ice Cream Sandwich?

Perhaps I’m overreacting, but it’s one thing when I buy a phone with a manufacturer skin – I know that updates will be delayed, and aren’t really even guaranteed. It’s another thing when I buy a pure Google device – Google has set a precedent for a somewhat regular update schedule, so I’m not happy to see that schedule tampered with.

What do you think?

[Gadgetronica via AndroidSPIN]
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John F

John was the editor-in-chief at Pocketables. His articles generally focus on all things Google, including Chrome and Android, although his love of new gadgets and technology doesn't stop there. His current arsenal includes the Nexus 6 by Motorola, the 2013 Nexus 7 by ASUS, the Nexus 9 by HTC, the LG G Watch, and the Chromebook Pixel, among others.

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11 thoughts on “Could Key Lime Pie be delayed in order for manufacturers to catch up?

  • Avatar of Steve Gaudreau
    April 23, 2013 at 3:52 pm
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    Okay, I’m all for forward progress but I find myself frustrated with how fast Google pumps out android os. I’m still getting used to Jellybean lol. So yeah just when you get used to an operating system the update or a new phone comes out. So is it really the phone manufacturer’s fault. Or is it possible that Google is just pushing to fast. Seems like every six months the next big thing comes out and it’s frustrating as a consumer

    Reply
  • Avatar of Michael
    April 23, 2013 at 6:07 pm
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    Google needs to drag the manufacturers and carriers out of the stone age. A selling point of Apple is there ability to move upgrades out to >75% of their base within a week.

    Why? Because they don’t let the carriers put bloat on their hardware.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Mike
      April 23, 2013 at 8:00 pm
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      Yep, and if all Android phones ran on the same processor, same display, same memory, same sensors, etc., etc., they too could update every phone within that time frame too.

      Your choice — if you want everything the same as everyone else, go with Apple. If you want choice and what suits you (or at least want a choice of what a manufacturer provides you or a vanilla Google experience) and not the whims of a single company then go with Android.

      Reply
  • Avatar of Ken
    April 23, 2013 at 8:42 pm
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    What Google needs to do is require that all devices run unaltered Android if they want to run Google Services (Play Store, etc.).

    Now, manufacturers like Samsung and HTC should be able to release Touchwiz and Sense. But they should have to be skins/launchers. They can come pre-loaded, but the option to disable must be there. And, if the user wants to upgrade (say from 2.3 to 4.0), they need to be notified that they will use the standard Android interface if Sense or Touchwiz isn’t ready and they can download an update later on for the launcher.

    If you want to get crazy, Google could require that Play access for released devices comes within a time frame of say 90-120 days of announce/release. If the device isn’t Google locks the devices out of Play and disables any new application downloads. The only way devices aren’t locked out is if the manufacturer officially ends support for the device.

    This would do a few things. First, it would ensure manufacturers deploy devices faster. Second, it would help customers know how manufacturers are supporting their devices. Third, it would put major pressure on the manufacturer if Google locked them out of installs on their devices because they didn’t update.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Gilly
    April 24, 2013 at 5:34 am
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    Ah, so HTC finds a new way to screw me over even though i left it to dry. That’s original there, good one.

    Reply
  • Avatar of nathan
    April 24, 2013 at 10:53 am
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    I thought Google already stated with the jellybean update that they’d will from now on release the source code to the key partners a couple months earlier before releasing it to the public.

    It’s not fair relating Apple software update time to Android update time because when Apple shows a update to the public, it already been through carrier testing for several months and is pretty much ready to go. Considering how much stuff Apple is able and does in the background and the fact that they hadn’t really had an increase of functionality in the iphone line software wise Android update cycles really don’t seem that bad.

    Reply
  • Avatar of Steve Gaudreau
    April 24, 2013 at 12:10 pm
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    Apple doesn’t come out with a new phone every six months. I’m still an apple iPhone hater lol

    Reply
  • Avatar of Simon Belmont
    April 24, 2013 at 4:29 pm
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    I’d be surprised if it was just for manufacturers to catch up. It may be more for technical reasons or they just need more time. If anything, they could just drop another minor Jelly Bean update and call it Android 4.3 until Key Lime Pie is ready. That would give manufacturers more time to get their devices up to growing Android 4.x market share. ;)

    I’d rather them deliver a polished product than a quick one. Android 4.2 was one of the buggier iterations (until Android 4.2.2), yet Android 4.1 was great out of the box. If Key Lime Pie needs more time, so be it. As long as it runs great on my Nexus 7 and the future ROMs for my EVO 3D. :)

    Reply
  • Avatar of Joe
    April 24, 2013 at 5:45 pm
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    How fair is it? Plenty fair considering you’ve enjoyed updates 6 months before the rest of us on the majority of devices. Yeah, you went into a Nexus device knowing that it would be updated sooner, but having two major OS upgrades a year when the average contract is 2 years is a little insane when the better phones (yes, I said better – the S3 was released first and was a better phone spec-wise than the N4 ever was).

    The N4 was a budget, no-contract phone that was merely ‘decent,’ and doesn’t represent the best of Android.

    Stop feeling entitled to the “latest and greatest” (COUGH, S2 [Greatest at the time] vs Galaxy Nexus [latest at the time] – Camera, Battery Life, Camera, etc) just because you bought the Nexus brand, even though it’s not really a Google product, just a phone without a carrier skin (Easy to do on any of the multiple superior devices if you’re half-competent with technology, and if you’re reading on this site and care so much about the version of Android your phone runs, you probably should already). Root your phone, put whatever version of Android you like on it, and stop dwelling on the Nexus name because you’re too lazy to bring your phone up to date yourself.

    Besides, it gives Google an excuse to spend even longer perfecting the new OS, and hopefully it will come out without the quirks we’ve seen in other releases in the recent past.

    Both the One and the S4 blow the LG Nexus 4 out of the water – it’s not even a competitor at this point, and the sad fact is that Nexus devices seem to always be playing catch-up instead of innovating at launch. There’s a reason I can get a N4 for $300 but a One would run me about double that – it’s simply a better phone.

    Reply
    • Avatar of Simon Belmont
      April 25, 2013 at 6:04 am
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      To be fair, the N4 was one of the most, if not most, powerful Android handsets at its launch. The Snapdragon S4 Pro still is no slouch and it’s way faster/higher performing than an SGS3. I realize that’s only one of many metrics in which one measures a phone’s performance and/or quality, but it stands. Yes, Google has these phones built on a budget, and that shows. I wanted a Nexus 4 in the beginning, but after the reality of it not (probably) being carried on Sprint, the myriads of broken back glass covers, the thermal throttling, no OTG support, and a few other niggling details, my interest began to wane. There’s been rumors of Google unveiling an LTE version with 32GB of storage at Google I/O next month and it could be on Sprint, but I’m not sure I’m interested.

      Now, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to want the latest and greatest in Google’s software. Frankly, there’s no substantiation on a delay at all at this point, and there’s certainly no real pointer to it being to “wait for manufacturers to catch up.” Put it this way, I’m an EVO 3D owner and I’m running Android 4.2.2 now (it runs wonderfully) and I’m happy as a clam with my phone. Nexus was never meant to be a flagship, “we’re competing with all other flagships” phone. It was just meant to be a good example of a vanilla Android experience at an affordable price. It achieves that pretty darned well.

      Reply
  • Avatar of Awesome Sauce
    April 26, 2013 at 8:00 am
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    False. Who cares about the manufacturers and if they catch up. Thats why they have Nexus phones.

    Reply

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