Accessory review: myCharge Peak 6000 portable power vault

The myCharge Peak 6000 is a portable spare battery for you and a couple of friends that is capable of charging the average smartphone several times before exhausting the 6000mAh rechargeable internal battery. With today’s wireless conditions, demanding smartphones, and Angry Birds Star Wars, your phone has most likely needed this at some point in the recent past to keep you talking, surfing, or throwing birds at pigs.

I reviewed its predecessor, the myCharge Power Bank back in March of this year, and although I liked that one and have used it these past six months, there were some issues I had with it at the outset, and subsequently in the later uses.

The myCharge Peak 6000 contains a battery that’s listed at three times the capacity of the HTC EVO 4G LTE, or a little over four times the capacity of an iPhone 5. Unfortunately, this does not translate into three and four charges for an EVO 4G LTE or iPhone 5 respectively due to conversion loss. You can expect to lose about 20% of juice any time you’re going from one battery into another battery.

The Peak 6000 adds the ability to fast charge the battery using built-in retractable wall-outlet prongs. The previous incarnation of this charger required a separate USB charging cable and could take up to 12 hours to charge from completely dead, although it could be charged off of a 1000mAh powered outlet in about six hours.  The Peak 6000 does the same in under three hours from what I’ve observed when plugged into a wall socket. It can also be charged through USB if for some reason you want to slow charge it.

All charging cables that the 6000 comes with either snap, fold, or are magnetically held in place while you’re not using them, making this beast of a charger a little less imposing. Like the Power Bank, it’s a lot larger than it appears it needs to be. For the footprint of the case, I could fit about four Seidio 4000mAh batteries into the thing, and still be a bit lighter than it comes in. It’s also significantly larger than the phone; I’d really expect around 12,000-16,000 mAh out of this beast.

If you’ve got an iPhone or device that uses the old style connector, there’s a charging cable that puts out 2100mAh for fast charging of tablets and anything else that can take it. The USB and microUSB ports are limited to 1000mAh, but that’s not really a limit so much rather than a standard.

The Peak 6000 also adds something totally unnecessary, and potentially cool, depending on your view of things. It speaks to you, letting you know how things are going, with notes such as: “Now charging USB device,” or “Now charging Apple device.” It also can tell you verbally the status of the battery if, for some reason, you need to know and can’t look at the indicator lights.

I’m not a huge fan of the speech capabilities myself, as I like to be able to plug things in and not wake someone up with verbal notifications that the phone is now charging. The instructions that ship with the thing thankfully have a sound-modes page, explaining how to disable, change the language, etc. You’ll require a paperclip or something similar to press one of two buttons hidden underneath the Apple charging jack.

Speaking of Apple, the Peak 6000 can plug into any USB port and act as a pass-through for anything connected to the Apple connector. I’m not really sure how useful this is, since that the device can be plugged into a wall instead of requiring a USB charge, but there it is.

The way the Peak 6000 is laid out, you can charge three devices at once; however, it doesn’t seem to work all that great at three. Two USB charge at what I think is the highest rate they should, one iDevice can charge at 2.1mAh which is the best it should, and if you mix and match those, you seem to have a limit of  3.1mAh total, along with the ability to drain the device significantly faster than you’d expect (under two hours).

All in all, I like the Peak 6000. It’s a bit over-engineered, and has a few features that I consider useless (such as voice notifications), but overall the thing ends up being just kind of neat. In fact, I really dig this thing. If you’re looking for a charger to keep your loved one in touch, I don’t think they’ll dislike this one, and you could do much worse for a gift.

The myCharge Peak 6000 is available for $99.99 from myCharge.

Pocketables does not accept targeted advertising, phony guest posts, paid reviews, etc. Help us keep this way with support on Patreon!

Paul E King

Paul King started with GoodAndEVO in 2011, which merged with Pocketables, and as of 2018 he's evidently the owner. He lives in Nashville, works at a film production company, is married with two kids. Facebook | Twitter | Donate | More posts by Paul | Subscribe to Paul's posts

17 thoughts on “Accessory review: myCharge Peak 6000 portable power vault

  • December 7, 2012 at 5:52 am
    Permalink

    “The USB and MicroUSB ports are limited to 1mAh, but that’s not really a limit so much rather than a standard.”

    It would take about 30 years to change a phone at 1ma!

    Reply
    • December 7, 2012 at 6:37 am
      Permalink

      I never claimed it charged the phones fast :)

      fixing now… thanks for the catch

      Reply
    • December 7, 2012 at 10:24 am
      Permalink

      That is pretty slick. Main difference appears to be that it doesn’t contain cables nor the ability to fast charge itself from a wall, nor a charger…

      For me the fast charge and self-containment of cables is mighty useful… but I haven’t really played with theirs, might give it a whirl and see how it stacks up.

      Reply
      • December 7, 2012 at 11:04 am
        Permalink

        it comes with 2 cables and diff attachment heads but ill only use one for the evo and yea it doesnt fast charge like the one you posted but still 30 bucks plus free shipping lol

        Reply
        • December 7, 2012 at 11:08 am
          Permalink

          Yup, not faulting it.. just pointing out the differences.

          I’ve been known to be the battery life of the party by bringing in a car jumper battery and car chargers in a pinch. The sleekness and design are nice, but for the same price I got a tire inflator, jump starter, and a 32 pound dumbbell that will run my phone for 164 days if I need it to… heheh

          Reply
  • December 7, 2012 at 10:03 am
    Permalink

    I just ordered the seidio innocell power case for my evo lte ($69.99), I think they just came out.

    Reply
    • December 7, 2012 at 10:21 am
      Permalink

      Supposedly one waits for me at my house today if UPS has been nice (except without the consumer packaging) and will be being written up over the weekend…

      That is supposedly…

      Reply
      • December 7, 2012 at 3:05 pm
        Permalink

        or, you know, alternately it could just be an airave sitting on my doorstep and not the case I’ve been waiting for…

        Reply
  • December 7, 2012 at 6:06 pm
    Permalink

    If not I’ll share my experience with it.

    Reply
    • December 9, 2012 at 12:28 pm
      Permalink

      let me know – what I had waiting was from Sprint, not Seidio… just waiting on that case to get here now… rrrr

      Reply
    • December 11, 2012 at 3:17 am
      Permalink

      My case has been sitting in Nashville for 3 days now at a FedEX sorting facility… supposedly it’ll be out for delivery tomorrow.

      I think the original plan was I was going to get this before they released the info to the public (as supposedly mine does not have the consumer packing) so I could review them before they shipped to consumers… but FedEX had other plans.

      So much for my ability to beat any other site to a review on this… rassafrassa

      Reply
      • December 11, 2012 at 9:53 am
        Permalink

        I received my innocell case yesterday, and my initial review, as for protection, the case doesn’t look to be able to protect the phone from any kind of drop. That being said I didn’t purchase this case for protection I bought it for power and with two 1750mAh batteries that can be switched in and out of the case I seemingly got just that. Aesthetically the case is… ok, my problem is the nub that sticks out of the micro-usb port. This nub protrudes about a quarter of an inch from the side of the phone and kind of kills the otherwise sleek exterior of the case. Hopefully my quick review can help tide people over until you get a chance to fully review this case. I for one can’t wait to get your take.

        Reply
        • December 11, 2012 at 10:08 am
          Permalink

          Additionally the case over doubles the width and weight of the phone, as well it covers and doesn’t come with a kickstand. Also the volume rocker just doesn’t feel as responsive as you’d like, the rocker doesn’t have much feedback as it comes to what you’d expect from a button press.

          Reply
        • December 11, 2012 at 12:10 pm
          Permalink

          Mine showed, charging it now… highlights I’ve run across so far are that if they’d put the USB connector in the other way you could have used it with their universal dock, they didn’t wire it for passthrough USB, and I’m pretty sure the NFC may be disabled with where the battery is at…

          Know more tomorrow after I go to the only place I’ve run across with a NFC reader in Nashville…

          Reply
        • December 11, 2012 at 12:28 pm
          Permalink

          actually scratch that comment on no passthrough – seems my USB hub just hates the case – computer is fine with it…

          Reply
        • December 12, 2012 at 12:34 am
          Permalink

          Review written. Skipping the battery life test as it’s Seidio and, well, they never fail me on batteries and I feel no real need to verify the levels and lifespan. (Seriously, my 4000mAh EVO 4G battery still holds 90%+ charge from 2010)

          Longest review for a product I think I have written that I probably would not purchase. It’s scheduled for 5PM pst, but it’s 2:30am where I’m at (CST) and I may be editing it earlier / posting…

          Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.